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Gorod masterov (1966)

The free medieval city with the majestic castle, the picturesque market square and cozy houses is conquered by troops of the spiteful knight de Malicorn. The mean tyrant dispatches spies ... See full summary »

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Writers:

, (story "Skazka o dvukh gorbunakh")
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Georgi Lapeto ...
Karakol'
Marianna Vertinskaya ...
Veronika
Lev Lemke ...
Duke de Malikorn
Pavel Shpringfeld ...
Musharon
...
Klik-Klyak
Yelizaveta Uvarova ...
Tafaro
Roman Filippov
Vasiliy Bychkov ...
Timolle (as Vasya Buchkov)
Zinoviy Gerdt ...
An artist
...
Firen jr.
Leonid Kanevskiy
Oleg Karavaychuk ...
(as Oleg Karavajchuk)
Nikolay Kharitonov ...
Master Firen (as N. Kharitonov)
Igor Komarov ...
Gilliom Gotshalk
Vladimir Kremena ...
Ninosh
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Storyline

The free medieval city with the majestic castle, the picturesque market square and cozy houses is conquered by troops of the spiteful knight de Malicorn. The mean tyrant dispatches spies everywhere, hires informers and is going to marry the first beauty - Veronika with distinguished shape of Marianna Vertinskaya. But the freedom-loving humpback Karakol to whom disposal of a hump and a wedding with Veronika is predicted brings together the humiliated inhabitants on fight against conquerors.

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

24 January 1966 (Soviet Union)  »

Also Known As:

The City of Masters  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
A fairy tale for children, or an allegory of Aleksandr Nevsky for adults.
7 April 2008 | by See all my reviews

A better translation of the Russian title "Gorod Masterov" would perhaps be "The City of Craftsmen", which was the version used by the BBC when the film was screened by the BBC in 3 parts for children's television in 1967.

And for children this is indeed a fairy tale, though for adults there is something much darker. For an adult, especially a Russian adult, the film is a wonderful parallel to Eisenstein's "Aleksandr Nevsky" - the choice of Tallinn's conical towers and bastions as a backdrop, the clothing and armour of the evil Duke's men to resemble the German Knights of the Order of the Sword, the quasi-religious character of Guillaume, the Duke's evil right-hand man, and the heroic resistance brought to victory by a man engaged in a humble occupation. There even seems to be a homage paid to the Robert Helpmann film of "Tales of Hoffmann" with similar use of views of stylised roof cocks, weather vanes and steep gabled houses.

The colour and design are superb, and so is the music. I loved this film when I first saw it 40 years ago, and even now catch myself whistling haunting melody Karakol' sings!


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