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Jeopardy! (TV Series 1984– ) Poster

(1984– )

Trivia

Ken Jennings currently holds the title for most wins on the show. He has won 74 times in a row.
Five shows are taped on Monday, and five shows are taped on Tuesday. Therefore two weeks worth of shows are taped each week.
On March 16, 2007, for the first time ever, the final question resulted in a three-way tie among the contestants (Jamey Kirby, Anders Martinson and Scott Weiss). They each won $16,000 after correctly identifying Bonnie Parker, of the infamous Bonnie and Clyde, to a question regarding women of the '30s. The odds of a three-way tie were calculated as being 1 in 25 million. Despite the odds the current champion admitted that he bet so that a tie could occur drastically diminishing the odds.
In the first season, contestants could buzz in as soon as the question was revealed. Starting in the second season, the contestants had to wait until host Trebek finished reading the question before they could buzz in. If they buzzed before this, they were "locked out".
The maximum amount of money one can win in a single game is $566,400. This assumes that one contestant sweeps both boards, finds all three Daily Doubles in the top tier, makes them true Daily Doubles, and gets them all last, and is allowed to play and wagers it all in Final Jeopardy. If he is not allowed to play in Final Jeopardy (no other contestants), then the maximum is half that or $283,200.
During the commercial break before Final Jeopardy, contestant coordinators provide each contestant with the proper interrogative (Who or What) to respond to the clue correctly.
Alex Trebek in his book about the show, says that one problem they had in the beginning was that contestants not only had to know the right answers to win, but they had to buzz in before any of the other players. They quickly discovered that this gave a decided advantage to younger players with faster reflexes and that when a 25 year old competed with a 55 year old, although the two of them might know the right answers to the same number of questions, the 25 year old would always win because he could buzz in faster than the older player. As a result, a special "Seniors Jeopardy" version of the show was created in which only older players could compete.
The dollar values of the categories were doubled in 2001. The lowest value was $200 in round one, the highest $1000, and the lowest in round two $400 and the highest $2000.
Initially, contestants who won five matches retired as an "undefeated champion" and returned for a $100,000 tournament of champions. Starting around 1997, five day champions also won a new car that they selected from about five. Starting in 2003-2004, the five day limit was lifted, and contestants could keep on being a champion as long as they kept winning.
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The main theme for the first pilot in 1983 was "January, February, March" which was originally the opening music for The All-New Jeopardy! and the break music was from a prize cue used on Wheel of Fortune called "Nightwalk". For Final Jeopardy! the original version of the "Think!" music was used . An electronic version of the "Think!" melody became the main theme for the second Trebek pilot in 1984. The second pilot also used the original think music.
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On the 19 January 1993 program, then Air Force Lt. Col. Daryl Scott won a game with only $1. He won another $13,401 the next day.
During the first season, the show was taped at Metromedia Studios. The next year, they moved to Hollywood Center Studios, where they would be until 1994. The show has been taping at Sony Pictures Studios since 1994.
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The series' original title was "What's the Question?".
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Beginning with the second season in 1985, the set background would change from blue to red in the Double Jeopardy! and Final Jeopardy! rounds. This practice was discontinued in Season 14 on October 6, 1997, although, on the Celebrity Jeopardy! Sportscasters episode that aired on January 23, 1998, the set did change to red in those rounds. Starting in 2002, with the debut of set#4, the set background changing to red for Final Jeopardy! However, the practice wasn't reinstated for Double Jeopardy!.
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In 1984, when Jeopardy! returned on to television, the main theme track was altered from that of the 1984 pilot to become more electronic. The original version of "Think!" was used for Final Jeopardy!. The main theme was remixed with a bongo track for the 1991-1992 tournament games. The remixed version was used full time starting in the 1992-93 season. In 1997, an all-new arrangement for both the main theme and the Final Jeopardy! Round "Think!" music made, with jazzy orchestral arrangements by Steve Kaplan. The main theme was updated again in 2001, with arrangements similar to the previous version. In 2008, an all-new arrangement of both the main theme and "Think!" music was created for the 25th season by Chris Bell Music, Inc. The theme has gone through some slight re-orchestrations since the beginning of the 25th season. Starting October 13, 2008, Jeopardy! began using a different track (from the same package) of the "Think!" music from time to time until it eventually replaced the previous version. The newer version used a piano lead.
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The episodes featuring Chuck Forrest, the first big winner on the show, were also the first episodes where the contestants were able to clear a board without the "times-up" beeps going off.
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Nikki Grillos, a two day champion in October 2015, is married to actor Paris Themmen, who is most recognizable for his role as Mike Teevee in Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971).
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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