Antiques Roadshow (1997– )

TV Series
7.4
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 7.4/10 from 518 users  
Reviews: 8 user | 3 critic

Appraisers of antiques travel with the show to various cities. Area citizens bring articles for appraisal and often relate the histories of these items. The appraisers then expand on what ... See full summary »

0Check in
0Share...

Watch Now

with Prime Instant Video

Editors' Spotlight

Fall TV Premiere Week

Many of your favorite shows are coming back, along with plenty of series premieres. Here's a list of the shows premiering between Sunday, September 21 and Friday, September 26.


User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 145 titles
created 19 Aug 2012
 
a list of 43 titles
created 18 Sep 2012
 
a list of 128 titles
created 28 Nov 2012
 
a list of 25 titles
created 12 Apr 2013
 
a list of 5 titles
created 2 months ago
 

Related Items


Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Antiques Roadshow (1997– )

Antiques Roadshow (1997– ) on IMDb 7.4/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Antiques Roadshow.

Episodes

Seasons


Years



Unknown   18   17   16   15   14   … See all »
Unknown   2014   2013   2012   … See all »
Nominated for 11 Primetime Emmys. Another 1 win. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

The Jerry Springer Show (TV Series 1991)
Comedy | Drama | Talk-Show
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 3.8/10 X  

Among his peers' other talk-shows, Jerry's is of the more passionate and of the more sensational. His topics range from bisexual affairs to rape. His guests sometimes get out of control and... See full summary »

Stars: Jerry Springer, Steve Wilkos, Chuck Conners
The Moment of Truth (TV Series 2008)
Game-Show | Reality-TV
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5/10 X  

Game show contestants are given a polygraph test and asked hard-hitting questions in front of a live audience in order to win a cash prize.

Stars: Mark L. Walberg, Angela Donahue, Kris Mohandie
History Detectives (TV Series 2003)
Documentary | History | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  
Stars: Elyse Luray, Tukufu Zuberi, Gwendolyn Wright
Match of the Day (TV Series 1964)
News | Sport
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.4/10 X  

Highlights and studio analysis of the day's football matches.

Stars: Gary Lineker, John Motson, Guy Mowbray
Nova (TV Series 1974)
Documentary | Biography
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.5/10 X  

Science documentaries.

Stars: Jay O. Sanders, Lance Lewman, Neil Ross
Antiques Roadshow FYI (TV Series 2005)
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

Tips on buying and selling collectibles, how to buy and sell at auctions, and follow-ups on some of the items discovered on _"Antiques Roadshow" (1997)_ (1997).

Stars: Clay Reynolds, Lara Spencer
Buried Treasure (TV Series 2011)
Reality-TV
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

Starring antiques experts and appraisers Leigh and Leslie Keno, who travel across the country to help people sell collectibles lying around their homes.

Stars: Leigh Keno, Leslie B. Keno, Graig F. Weich
Celebrity Antiques Road Trip (TV Series 2011)
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  
Stars: Honor Blackman, Britt Ekland, Tony Blackburn
Bargain Hunt (TV Series 2000)
Game-Show
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  
Stars: Tim Wonnacott, Mark Stacey, David Dickinson
Temptation Island (2001–2003)
Reality-TV
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 3.2/10 X  

A real-life dramatic series where boyfriends/girlfriends travel to a romantic place to quiz and fascinate the strengths of their relationships. Once the location has been selected, the ... See full summary »

Stars: Mark L. Walberg, Mandy Lauderdale, Billy Cleary
Make Me a Millionaire (2009–2010)
Game-Show
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Stars: Liz Hernandez, Mark L. Walberg
Shop 'Til You Drop (1991–2005)
Game-Show
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

Two teams compete in this game show, a cross between "The Price is Right" and "Beat the Clock."

Stars: Dee Bradley Baker, Ossie Beck, Tony Boldi
Edit

Cast

Series cast summary:
...
 Himself - Host / ... (156 episodes, 2002-2014)
Edit

Storyline

Appraisers of antiques travel with the show to various cities. Area citizens bring articles for appraisal and often relate the histories of these items. The appraisers then expand on what is known about the treasures, sometimes exposing them as fakes, and they estimate the pieces' financial value. The show also includes tips for aspiring collectors of a wide range of items. Written by Carl J. Youngdahl <zomno@casbah.acns.nwu.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Part adventure, part history lesson, and part treasure hunt. See more »

Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

9 January 1997 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

One of the episodes featured a woman with a fifteenth century Spanish parade helmet; this episode has been taken off the syndication list because the producers were unable to reach the woman later. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Parks and Recreation: Camping (2011) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A Very Informative Show on the Value of Collectibles, Items of Premium Value, But Not All Are Antiques
17 November 2009 | by (Oakland, CA) – See all my reviews

This show is actually derived from a British show of the same name produced by the BBC that began in 1979. The name "Antiques Roadshow" (the American PBS version) is somewhat of a misnomer as an antique is generally defined as an artifact dating before 1900. The showcased artifacts come under the larger umbrella term "collectibles". A collectible is essentially any item that has some kind of premium value above and beyond what it either originally sold for and/or an item of exceptional quality and/or rarity. Often that can mean an older item but not always.

For example, there are hundred-year old items, such as Bibles from the late 1800's that are worth only $10 to 20 (low demand versus high quantity) while there are lamps and chairs by influential designers from the 1960's that are worth $10,000's. Ancient coins 1500+ years old are actually quite numerous (millions of them exist) and many can be obtained for only a few dollars. Simultaneously, a Tiffani lamp from about 100 years ago can fetch from $50,000 to $150,000. The age of the item does not necessarily predict its worth, although the older an item, the more likely less of them still exist. An item's market value depends upon what it is, its condition, how many of them survive, and what kind of demand there is with the last factor being the most determining. Items of scarcity with little or no demand still can't compete with items of more numerous quantity in which the demand is very high.

One of the criticisms of this show is that some of the appraisals seem high, and a few up in the stratosphere. Viewers should keep in mind that these appraisals are only estimates, and the appraisers are advertising themselves and their services. Collectible items have a way of fluctuating up-and-down depending upon current market trends. As of this writing in Fall of 2009, many collectibles have dipped in value (some by as much as 40%) as a result of the current economic instability. An item is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it despite popular misconception that artifacts have intrinsic worth except in regards to heirlooms and personal items that are priceless to a particular family or group. Just because an artifact or premium item sold for such-and-such an amount in the past does not mean they will necessarily realize it in the future, but that information can be used to approximate a current value. And there are a few items whose collectible values have receded over the years because demand has lessened; this appears to be the exception and not the rule. And of course, there is always the problem of fakes and facsimiles, and the experts have many ways to tell the difference.

The dealer-appraisers on the show are constantly looking for new clients who have premium items to sell and/or consign on the collectibles-antiques market. When these appraisers and dealers say "auction", they are usually referring to the very well-publicized high-end international auctions, such as Christies and Sothebys. There are numerous smaller auctions around the United States, and not all of them can fetch the kind of money realized by the international houses. Also, a few of these people are high-end dealers who own a shop and/or company, some of whose clients are household names, like financial magnate Donald Trump and football celebrity Joe Montana who collect Ancient Roman and Greek artifacts from antiquity. So while an item might realize $100,000 at a Sotheby's auction, a smaller auction in a smaller community may only be able to realize a fraction thereof.

After having watched the show religiously for going on 5 years, I gather that many of the people who bring their items to the show are unaware of the vastness of the collectibles-antiques market and how much money it makes every year. A few participants are flabbergasted when the painting they were going to throw away is appraised at between $50,000 to $100,000. Most of the participants have modest incomes, and couldn't imagine paying the kind of money that some of these items are worth. Some of the best moments are the appraisals of items that were found at yard sales and thrift shops for under $100 (sometimes under $20) that turn out to be worth a small fortune. On the other side of the spectrum, there are the fakes and facsimiles, some of which are almost indistinguishable from authentic pieces. There have been a handful of participants who have been duped into paying good money for an item that, after close scrutiny by the expert, lacks authenticity, some of which were specifically designed to deceive well-intentioned buyers. Buyer beware!

Without having been to the Roadshow, I would venture that 90% of the items brought have little value, under $100 in other words. Of that 10%, probably 90% of those are in the $100 to $1000 range. And then there is the cream of the crop, items that have serious value, which probably represents less than 1% of all the items brought to the show. It is these items that are showcased on the television broadcast, although my understanding is that having one of these items does not guarantee a spot.

The main point of the show, I think, is that there are many collectible items that are still out there. You don't have to go to Christie's and Sotheby's to find some of these things if you are of more modest means. Certainly, you are probably not going to find a Rembrandt or a Da Vinci at a Salvation Army Thrist Store, but you might find something that is worth much more than the asking price. And don't pay good money for items unless the dealer's reputation is well documented. Do not collect for value alone which could be disappointing in years to come. The golden rule of collecting is to collect what you enjoy.


1 of 3 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
William Aiken Walker painting - Cincinnati rotellaterreri
Highest appraisals. unearthednjhc
An emmy!!!!? Blueangel90716
Does anyone remember... zlada
A little upset with the roadshow... John120
An emmy? French_girl98
Discuss Antiques Roadshow (1997) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page