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3   2   1  
1983   1982   1981  

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Cast

Series cast summary:
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 Barbara Gray / ... 30 episodes, 1981-1983
...
 Duke of Broughton / ... 13 episodes, 1982-1983
Natalie Forbes ...
 Tilly Wilcox, Maid 13 episodes, 1982-1983
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year 1932 | See All (1) »

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Drama

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Release Date:

10 January 1981 (UK)  »

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Technical Specs

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(30 episodes)

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1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Wendy Craig, who both acted in and created the show, submitted her proposal for the series to the BBC, she used the pseudonym Jonathan Marr because she was afraid that if her true identity was known, she would be dismissed as merely "an actress who thinks she can write". See more »

Connections

Featured in Maid in Britain (2010) See more »

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User Reviews

A wonderful series!
28 February 2007 | by See all my reviews

I completely agree with the comment posted above. I also keep looking for it on DVD. If I remember correctly, it begins between the Wars & goes up through the beginning of WW II. The nanny character is depicted working for four different families over a period of twelve or so years. There is good romantic content & excellent backgrounds. One family was of a Duke---that was the one filmed at Kedleston Hall. David Burke (Sherlock Holmes' Dr. Watson) plays her husband who begins working for Military Intel at the outbreak of the war.

The British series was called "Nanny"; the 1990's Amer. comedy was called "The Nanny"---so don't be confused if you see the latter listed somewhere. Perhaps enough request to Acorn Media will result in this series being made available to American audiences.


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