6.4/10
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172 user 117 critic

Enigma (2001)

A young genius frantically races against time to crack an enemy code and solve the mystery surrounding the woman he loves.

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Writers:

(novel), (screenplay)

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ON DISC
3 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Puck (as Nikolaj Coster Waldau)
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Ian Felce ...
Bohdan Poraj ...
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Storyline

During the heart of World War II, in March of 1943, cryptoanalysts at Britain's code-breaking center have discovered to their horror that Nazi U-boats have changed their Enigma Code. Authorities enlist the help of a brilliant young man named Tom Jericho to help them break the code again. The possibility of a spy within the British code-breakers' ranks looms and Tom's love, Claire, has disappeared. To solve the mysteries, Tom recruits Claire's best friend, Hester Wallace. In investigating Claire's personal life, the pair discovers personal and international betrayals. Written by Anna <dimenxia@yahoo.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

10,000,000,000,000,000+ combinations - 24 hours to get it right See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for a sex scene and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Language:

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Release Date:

7 June 2002 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Enigma - Das Geheimnis  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$1,163,293 (Europe) (28 September 2001)

Gross:

$4,298,329 (USA) (24 November 2002)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of the motivations behind making this movie was the indignation of many British World War 2 veterans (and civilians) over the movie U-571 (2000), in which the capture of the Enigma was shown to be done by American navy officers (despite the fact that the makers of that movie had indicated their movie to be a work of fiction and no accurate portrayal of the events leading to the capture of the Enigma). See more »

Goofs

Near the end of the film, when the submarine explodes, our hero is nearby in the water. Unfortunately, water transmits waves exceptionally well. Anyone in the water for at least a square mile would be immediately killed from the shock. See more »

Quotes

Jozef 'Puck' Pukowski: Tell me, are we hoping for the U-Boats to find our convoy?
Pinker: Of course not.
Baxter: I am.
[receives stares]
Pinker: You c-c-can't mean that!
Baxter: What? Sacrifice a convoy to get back into Shark? Of course I would. How many men has Stalin had to sacrifice so far? A million? Two million? It's called "the greater good."
Cave: Spoken like someone who isn't in the middle of the North Atlantic at this moment.
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Connections

Referenced in Cash Trapped: Episode #2.10 (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

Black Bottom
(1926)
Music by Ray Henderson
Lyrics by Lew Brown and Bud Desylva Harms Inc
By kind permission of Warner/Chappell Music Limited, Redwood Music Limited, Stephen Ballentine Publishing Company,
Henderson Music
Performed by Howard Lannin & His Orchestra
Licensed by kind permission of BMG Entertainment International (UK & Ireland) Limited
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User Reviews

 
A decent spy yarn but falls far short of the true story
29 October 2003 | by (Oklahoma) – See all my reviews

A couple of years ago PBS aired a 2-hour episode of Nova (the American equivalent of the BBC's Horizon) called 'Decoding Nazi Secrets.' It was a fascinating documentary about the work done at Bletchley Park, as well as some material about its American counterpart, Arlington Hall. I had wished it was even longer, for I suspected that what was left out was as interesting as what was included. Among the many memorable characters in the story, none stood out more than Alan Turing, a painfully shy, socially awkward, utterly brilliant genius. I found myself wishing that someone would make a theatrical film about the Enigma code and a film of Alan Turing's life, or both.

Unfortunately, this isn't it. In March of 1943, code-breakers at Bletchley Park discover to their horror that the German navy has changed the code sets used to communicate with U-boats at sea. These were based on the famous and diabolically complex encryption machine known as the Enigma. Authorities enlist the help of a brilliant young man named Tom Jericho (played by Dougray Scott) to help them break the code again. The possibility of a spy within the British code-breakers' ranks is raised, and Tom's love interest, Claire (Saffron Burrows), has disappeared. To solve these mysteries, Tom recruits Claire's best friend, Hester Wallace (Kate Winslet). While investigating Claire's personal life, the pair discovers personal and international betrayals involving the now-infamous Katyn massacre in Poland. Of course, Tom and Hester fall in love.

Dougray Scott actually does bear some physical resemblance to Alan Turing, but there the comparison ends. Turing's sorry, shabby reward for the instrumental role he played in winning the war for Britain was to be persecuted during the Cold War because his homosexuality was viewed as a security risk, to the point that he committed suicide. While 'Enigma' looks good and plays fairly well as a decent espionage film, the viewer who knows the factual background of this piece of fiction will probably be disappointed. The best part for me was the recreation of the physical setting at wartime Bletchley Park, especially the Enigma machines themselves and the famous Bombes, which were invented by Turing (Jericho in the film). These were among the world's first computing machines; they were a stroke of brilliance by Turing: Instead of looking for what a coded message WAS, they operated according to the principle of eliminating what it was NOT. This cut the number of possibilities by better than 90% and greatly simplified the work of the human code-breakers. It is somewhat surprising that this rather wan film is the work of Tom Stoppard and Michael Apted; they have done better.


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