Front Page Challenge (1957–1996)

TV Series  -  Family | Game-Show
7.6
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Ratings: 7.6/10 from 19 users  
Reviews: 2 user | 1 critic

A game show where noted Canadian journalists guess the news story associated with the mystery guests and then conduct interviews with them.

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Title: Front Page Challenge (1957–1996)

Front Page Challenge (1957–1996) on IMDb 7.6/10

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Unknown  
1989   1981   1965   1964   … See all »
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Cast

Series cast summary:
Pierre Berton ...
 Himself - Panelist / ... (4 episodes, 1959-1989)
Fred Davis ...
 Himself - Moderator (3 episodes, 1959-1989)
Gordon Sinclair ...
 Himself - Panelist / ... (3 episodes, 1959-1981)
Toby Robins ...
 Herself - Panelist (2 episodes, 1959-1960)
Betty Kennedy ...
 Herself / ... (2 episodes, 1981-1989)
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Storyline

In this long running game & interview show, famous Canadian journalists try to guess what news story the hidden guest is associated with. After the challenge is done and the guest is revealed, the contestants then engage as a panel of interviewers as they talk with the guest about the news story in question. Guests included international and Canadian figures like future Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, Martin Luther King and many others. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

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Genres:

Family | Game-Show

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Daytime Challenge  »

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Featured in The Real Malcolm X (1992) See more »

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Time's Up Panel!
13 June 2006 | by (Dundalk, Canada) – See all my reviews

I believe Front Page Challenge was a temporary replacement show that became popular enough to bump the original program. The concept was as follows: A mystery guest (still visible to those at home) would be hidden from the view of the panel, who would have to find clues by asking the guest a time-limited selection of questions. Whether or not the guest's identity had been found out, the panel would have the opportunity to interview the guest briefly. Usually each half-hour show consisted of two mystery headlines for the panel to solve.

The curmudgeonly Gordon Sinclair would always ask the first question, which was always "How much money do you make?" Once that was out of the way, it was over to YOU, Betty Kennedy, who filled the chair of glamorous actress Toby Robins later in the life of the show. Betty, herself a real hottie in her youth, could be relied upon to ask hard-hitting journalistic questions like if the guest was married, if they had children, or who was their favorite Beatle. Then Pierre Berton would impress everyone with a smarmy fact he uncovered while researching his latest book, but before he could really get into the interview, the theme music began to play and studio lights dimmed, followed by host Fred Davis' goodbye.

Speaking of the flavorless host Davis, he appeared only to be there to direct traffic on the show, not impress anyone with his sharp wit, or willowy stage presence. The non-descript show, which was evidently done before a live audience, seemed somehow to have enough relevance to hold the interest of most who tuned in. The impressive mystery guest list included such luminaries as Pierre Trudeau, Malcolm X and Ed Sullivan. Often the guest panelists were quasi-famous Canadian actors, or journalists.

While Front Page Challenge' production values aimed not to overshadow their famous guests, they probably 'blanded' themselves right out of work. This was a pretty good concept for the late 1950s, but it was really wearing thin by the time it left the airwaves for good in 1995. No matter - by that time it was the longest continually running non-news program in Canadian television history.


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