Animated documentary short film demonstrating the reasons and methods of the point system of wartime food rationing.

Director:

(uncredited)
Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.9/10 X  

A documentary about the use of 'Raymond Scott' music in the Looney Tunes cartoon shorts.

Director: Constantine Nasr
Stars: Jerry Beck, Irwin Chusid, Tom Kenny
Spies (1943)
Animation | Short | Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

Private Snafu has a secret: his ship leaves for Africa at 4:30. He's determined to keep it, but bit by bit it slips out, and eventually, the details end up right on Hitler's desk and the ship is engaged.

Director: Chuck Jones
Stars: Mel Blanc
Animation | Comedy | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

The characters of the traditional fairy tale demand a new approach to the story as a sexy urban comedy with Red as an adult nightclub dancer.

Director: Tex Avery
Stars: Sara Berner, Daws Butler, June Foray
Animation | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

An ex-soldier, quickly growing disenchanted with civilian life, considers the benefits of re-enlistment.

Director: Chuck Jones
Stars: Mel Blanc, Daws Butler, June Foray
Documentary | Short | Animation
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.1/10 X  

An illustration of the role public health agencies play in citizens' lives.

Director: Chuck Jones
Stars: Mel Blanc, Frank Graham
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6/10 X  

A documentary about One Froggy Evening (1955).

Stars: Jerry Beck, Corny Cole, Eric Goldberg
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

A documentary about What's Opera, Doc? (1957).

Director: Constantine Nasr
Stars: Jerry Beck, Corny Cole, Daniel Goldmark
Edit

Cast

Uncredited cast:
Robert C. Bruce ...
Narrator (voice) (uncredited)
Edit

Storyline

In the face of wartime demands and agricultural personnel shortages during World War II, food rationing was necessary. This film explains the US Government's answer of of these wartime realities, point based rationing. Furthermore, the system's application is illustrated as we follow a typical grocery shopper at the store who learns to use it in her favor. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

25 February 1943 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Produced by Chuck Jones' unit on nights and weekends. See more »

Soundtracks

This Is Worth Fighting For
(uncredited)
Music by Sam H. Stept
Played during the opening credits and often in the score
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
How many times do I have to tell people that war (whether you support it or not) necessitates rationing?
4 November 2007 | by (Portland, Oregon, USA) – See all my reviews

There is little that makes me nostalgic for WWII (even though I wasn't born until thirty-nine years after it ended) more than a movie like "Point Rationing of Foods". Although created by Leon Schlesinger Studios, this short film is nothing at all like the Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies cartoons. It explains the process and purpose of wartime rationing, and how one can substitute certain foodstuffs so as to save money.

Yes, it's true. Even though WWII (you know, the war in which we fought the political alliance that had attacked us, rather than invading a country that had nothing to do with the attack?) was a very jingoistic era, our government established a system of rationing to ensure that we could supply our troops and allies with whatever they needed. Furthermore, Franklin Roosevelt imposed very high taxes on the ultra-wealthy so as to pay for the war. But now, during the so-called "war on terrorism", our government allows - if not encourages - consumerism; on top of that, George W. Bush is the first wartime president who didn't raise taxes. Obviously, he's got no time to worry about giving the troops the necessary body armor as long as he enriches Blackwater and ignores New Orleans.

In the future, people are going to look back at the early 21st century and wonder why we didn't take the steps that we took in WWII. If I may make a suggestion, the United Nations needs to pass a binding resolution banning extremists from seeking political office. Had they done that after WWII, the world probably wouldn't be in this big mess in which it finds itself today; heck, if the League of Nations had done it after WWI, we might have never had WWII. Had either organization set about enforcing democracy from the start, I bet that the United States would have established universal health care a long time ago. Of course, hindsight is far easier than foresight.

But I digress. While this short film is very much a product of WWII, I still really liked it, if only because of what it teaches us about the past and how we should be running the current war (as long as we choose to fight wars).


4 of 7 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss Point Rationing of Foods (1943) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?