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Following (1998)

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A young writer who follows strangers for material meets a thief who takes him under his wing.

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3,667 ( 212)
5 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Alex Haw ...
...
...
Dick Bradsell ...
The Bald Guy
Gillian El-Kadi ...
Home Owner
Jennifer Angel ...
Waitress
Nicolas Carlotti ...
Barman
...
Accountant
Guy Greenway ...
Heavy #1
Tassos Stevens ...
Heavy #2
Tristan Martin ...
Man at Bar
...
Woman at Bar
Paul Mason ...
Home Owner's Friend
David Bovill ...
Home Owner's Husband
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Storyline

An older man listens to Bill's story about being a callow writer who likes to follow strangers around London, observing them. One day, a glib and self-confident man whom Bill has been following confronts him. He's Cobb, a burglar who takes Bill under his wing and shows him how to break and enter. They burgle a woman's flat; Bill gets intrigued with her (photographs are everywhere in her flat). He follows her and chats her up at a bar owned by her ex-boyfriend, a nasty piece of work who killed someone in her living room with a hammer. Soon Bill is volunteering to do her a favor, which involves a break-in. What does the older man know that Bill doesn't? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

You're Never Alone.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and some violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

5 November 1999 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

A Csapda  »

Filming Locations:


Box Office

Budget:

$6,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$1,636 (USA) (2 April 1999)

Gross:

$43,188 (USA) (6 August 1999)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

,  »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The second apartment Bill and Cobb break into has a Batman sticker on the door. Christopher Nolan would later go on to direct "The Dark Knight Trilogy", which consists of Batman Begins (2005), The Dark Knight (2008) and The Dark Knight Rises (2012). See more »

Goofs

At the site of the safe robbery, when The Young Man drops his pants to tape the money to his legs, he's wearing striped underwear (which are also seen hanging on a clothesline during the confrontation between The Young Man and Cobb later in the film), but when he returns to his apartment and removes the money, he's wearing underwear with polka dots. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Bill: The following is my explanation. Well, more of an account of what happened. I'd been on my own for a while and getting kind of lonely... and bored... nothing to do all day. And that's when I started shadowing.
The Policeman: Shadowing?
Bill: Shadowing - Following. I started to follow people
The Policeman: Who?
Bill: Anyone at first. Um,
[sniffs]
Bill: you know, that was the whole point - somebody at random, someone who didn't know who I was.
The Policeman: And then?
Bill: And then nothing.
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Connections

Referenced in Inception (2010) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Nolan's Clever Debut
14 April 2003 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

The debut that plucked from obscurity one of the brighter stars of contemporary noir is an assured, if limited, stab at the con game and obsession. Filmed for zero money, Nolan couldn't have chosen a better subject than the drab and seamy underside of London to ply his trade, given the lack of funds. This short (67 min) is at its best in playing with the audience's and protagonist's expectations about who is scamming whom, though the initial set-up does ring some alarm bells in the credibility dept. The muddy cinematography (he often used natural lighting due to budget) can be mostly chalked up to noir stylization, though the limitations do show at times.

One can easily see Nolan's style developing in this fledgling effort; many of the same themes of blurred identity and expectation smashing recur in MEMENTO and INSOMNIA. Not a masterpiece but good and certainly worth a look for modern noir and Nolan fans.


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