When his bank fails, a young man loses not only all his money but his fiancée, deserts him, too. Depressed, he joins a circus.

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(story) (as Harold E. Tarshis), (screenplay)
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Cast

Cast overview:
...
Penny Lee
Allen Vincent ...
Tom Warren
Donald Kerr ...
Dick
Rollo Lloyd ...
Harry
...
Jim Ryan
...
Anita Faye ...
Trixie
Rich Hayes ...
P.T. 'Porky' Owens
Earl McDonald ...
Carl
...
Gorilla Watson
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Storyline

When his bank fails, a young man loses not only all his money but his fiancée, deserts him, too. Depressed, he joins a circus.

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lost film | See All (1) »

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Drama

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11 November 1933 (USA)  »

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1.37 : 1
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Trivia

This film is one of over 200 titles in the list of independent feature films made available for television presentation by Advance Television Pictures announced in Motion Picture Herald 4 April 1942. At this time, television broadcasting was in its infancy, almost totally curtailed by the advent of World War II, and would not continue to develop until 1945-1946. Because of poor documentation (feature films were often not identified by title in conventional sources) no record has yet been found of its initial television broadcast. It's earliest documented telecast was Sunday 28 November 1948 on WATV, New York City. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Tough Talking Boots!!
5 June 2014 | by (Australia) – See all my reviews

Poor Boots - all set to go, then going nowhere! Named a 1932 Wampas Baby Star, 1933 proved her busiest year - then she was selected as star of Erich Von Stroheim's comeback picture "Walking Down Broadway", initially to be a hard hitting story of young love battling the depression and all that goes with it. Then, as usual on a Von Stroheim movie, the studio stepped in, assigned another director and what emerged was just another ordinary programmer. Looking at Boot's list of credits, her career didn't recover - I don't know why, she was lovely looking and wasn't any worse than a lot of other actresses who thrived.

Usually at home playing demure ingénues, this time Boots is a tough talking carnival dancer who has her hands full with "rough stuff" boyfriend Ryan (Jason Robards), a high diving specialist who is soon out of the picture via the hospital!! That gives Tom Warren (Allen Vincent) an opportunity to make good. He has turned up as a down and out at the carnival but he is, in reality, part of a young society group (you can tell they are upper crust because they sound so "tewwibly, tewwibly" British!!) who at the start are celebrating his coming marriage. The only person missing is the bride to be - she has heard that the bank in which he has been employed has gone bust due to embezzlement of it's funds - and has assumed (as a loyal, supportive fiancée) that he must be involved. Tom of course does the smart thing to clear his name - he runs away and even though he tells his new found friend Dick (Donald Kerr) that he has sworn off dames for life that doesn't stop him falling for carnival cutie Penny.

Once Penny turns off the tough talk she sounds as though she would be right at home in a New York penthouse, much more so than Tom. But when Tom's "tony" friends visit the carnival and laugh and titter at him hobnobbing with "those people", Penny puts on an act supposedly to send him back, chastened, to the right type of people. Of course you know how it ends - with Tom and Penny giving a cocktail party and Penny being talked about for all the right reasons!!

Allen Vincent's movie highpoint was as the lead no one remembers in "The Mystery of the Wax Museum"(1933) and while bubbly Anita Faye only had two films to her credit she comes across as a minor league Marjorie White.

This film is definitely not lost anymore, Alpha at Oldies.com has a reasonable print.


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