5.9/10
186
8 user 1 critic

You're a Sap, Mr. Jap (1942)

Popeye takes on the Japanese Navy single-handedly.

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(story) (as Jim Tyer), (story)

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Cast

Uncredited cast:
Jack Mercer ...
Popeye / Japanese Sailors (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

Popeye's sailing out in the Pacific, spoiling for a fight with the Japanese. He comes across what looks a Japanese fishing boat, but, just before Popeye lets loose with the old fists, the Japs offer him a peace treaty. Popeye's all for peace, but are the Japanese men of their word? Written by Jonathan D. H. Parshall <parshall@citcom.net>

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Approved | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

7 August 1942 (USA)  »

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(Western Electric Noiseless Recording)
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The title song was reportedly written and copyrighted three hours before Congress declared war on Japan. See more »

Connections

Featured in Animation Lookback: Top 10 Controversial Cartoons (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

You're a Sap, Mister Jap
Words and Music by James Cavanaugh, John Redmond and Nat Simon
Performed by Jack Mercer and chorus at the beginning
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User Reviews

 
Wartime Propaganda
12 March 2000 | by (St. Louis, Missouri) – See all my reviews

If you are very sensitive when it comes to extreme racial stereotypes, this cartoon is not for you. But if you are strongly interested in seeing a rare piece of wartime animation, come on in!

In this cartoon, Popeye is patrolling the seas and discovers what looks like a Japanese fishing boat. The two Japanese fishermen trick Popeye into thinking that they want a peace treaty signed. But looks can be deceiving; the fishing boat turns out to be a Japanese navy ship! What follows is considered today to be morale-boosting propaganda.

Be forewarned, the representations of the Japanese in the film are done in a mean-spirited fashion. Keep in mind, though, that there was a war going on at the time. But I strongly recommend this cartoon to those who are interested in the WWII era.


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