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What's Sweepin' (1953)

Woody is a city street sweeper and hates his job. After being abused by policeman Wally Walrus, he decides to quit and disguises himself as a policeman, kicking the rubbish can away which ... See full summary »

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Cast

Uncredited cast:
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Wally Walrus / Bull Dozer / Store Owner / Circus Owner / Strongman (voice) (uncredited)
Grace Stafford ...
Woody Woodpecker (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

Woody is a city street sweeper and hates his job. After being abused by policeman Wally Walrus, he decides to quit and disguises himself as a policeman, kicking the rubbish can away which scoops up Wally sending him into the harbour shrinking his uniform. The angry Wally chases the disguised Woody into the circus. Because he is mistaken for a child, he is denied access but enters backstage disguised as an elephant. Finally, after a long struggle with Woody under the big top, he captures the redhead and returns him to his job as street sweeper. Written by Matt Yorston <george.y@ns.sympatico.ca>

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Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

5 January 1953 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Søren Spætte som gadefejer  »

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Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Too Mild
18 April 2008 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

This episode of the Woody Woodpecker franchise is saggy in the middle, because of the relatively weak gags, and the the inconsistency of the setting -- at first it seems to be turn-of-the-century, given Wally Walrus' antique police uniform and Woody's occupation as a 'White Wings' street sweeper, but there is a television set used as part of one gag....

Even worse than those is the watering down of Woody's manic personality in the decade since Seamus Culhane was in charge of his best shorts. It may have been more realistic to not have Woody split into four or five doppelgangers, as in THE BARBER OF SEVILLE, as if realism was a primary concern of of cartoon makers. But it's a heck of a lot less interesting.


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