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The Voice That Thrilled the World (1943)

| Short, History

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This short traces the history of sound in the movies, beginning with French scientist Leon Scott's experiments in 1857.

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Narrator (voice)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Giovanni Martinelli ...
Canio in 'Pagliacci' (segment "Vesti la giubba") (archive footage)
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Storyline

Warner Brothers pays tribute to the history of sound recording, to talking pictures, and to itself. Fresh from its "Yankee Doodle Dandy" Oscar for sound, Warner Brothers celebrates those who's work brought the world from research to sound recordings and from there to a movie with a musical score ("Don Juan"), film with synchronized sound ("Jazz Singer" and "Vesti la giubba"), and the first all-talking picture, "Lights of New York." Film clips celebrate Ethel Waters' singing, Paul Muni's biopics, Bette Davis and Gary Cooper's Oscars (plus Sgt. York speaking English, French, and Italian), and World War II newsreels and training films. Cagney's Oscar: 100 years in development. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

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Short | History

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(RCA Sound System)

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1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vitaphone release number 1179A. See more »

Connections

Featured in The Soundman (1950) See more »

Soundtracks

Swanee
(uncredited)
Music by George Gershwin
Played during the introduction to "The Jazz Singer"
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User Reviews

Jazz Singer Disc 3
27 February 2008 | by (Louisville, KY) – See all my reviews

Voice from the Screen, The (1926)

* 1/2 (out of 4)

Historically important yet deadly dull documentary was made by Vitaphone and Warner so that they could explain how they were going to add sound to movies. The man talking and explaining all of this is deadly dull, which leads to a pretty boring short but he also explains everything in circles, which makes the information quite confusing as well.

Finding His Voice (1929)

** 1/2 (out of 4)

Co-directed by Max Fleischer, this cartoon short has an animated figure learning how to speak on film. Once again, the main purpose here is to explain how sound has been added to film and this one here is pretty entertaining and it also doesn't take itself too serious, which makes it easier to understand.

Voice That Thrilled the World, The (1943)

*** (out of 4)

Documentary short about how sound came to movies and what it has led to. This Warner short features clips from many of their films and really centers on Yankee Doodle Dandy since it had just won the Oscar for Best Sound. We also get clips from The Jazz Singer, Don Juan and The Lights of New York, which was the first all talkie.

OK For Sound (1946)

** 1/2 (out of 4)

Documentary covering the 20th Anniversary of sound films once again shows clips from all the big movies and tries to explain why sound was so important. The documentary loses points for making fun of the silent film but this was the attitude of the time, which is why so many silent films are now lost.

When the Talkies Were Young (1955)

*** (out of 4)

Documentary taking a look at the early sound pictures from Warner. The film shows off all of Warner's hot stars including Cagney, Tracy, Robinson, Davis and Stanwyck. This is basically a long trailer compilation but they do pick out some good and so far unavailable titles on DVD.


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