MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Up 50,480 this week

The Lumière Brothers' First Films (1996)

Unrated  |   |  Documentary, History
8.0
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 8.0/10 from 294 users  
Reviews: 4 user | 1 critic

A collection of short films made by the Lumiere brothers, a team of pioneering filmmakers in turn-of-the-century France.

0Check in
0Share...

IMDb Picks: May

Visit our IMDb Picks section to see our recommendations of movies and TV shows coming out in May, sponsored by COVERGIRL.

Visit the IMDb Picks section

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 411 titles
created 06 Feb 2012
 
list image
a list of 55 titles
created 29 Mar 2012
 
a list of 122 titles
created 29 Aug 2013
 
a list of 519 titles
created 07 Sep 2013
 
a list of 1654 titles
created 12 Feb 2014
 

Related Items

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: The Lumière Brothers' First Films (1996)

The Lumière Brothers' First Films (1996) on IMDb 8/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of The Lumière Brothers' First Films.

User Polls

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

A group of people are standing in a straight line along the platform of a railway station, waiting for a train, which is seen coming at some distance. When the train stops at the platform, ... See full summary »

Directors: Auguste Lumière, Louis Lumière
Short | Adventure | Fantasy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

A group of astronomers go on an expedition to the moon.

Director: Georges Méliès
Stars: Georges Méliès, François Lallement, Jules-Eugène Legris
Short | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

A group of bandits stage a brazen train hold-up, only to find a determined posse hot on their heels.

Director: Edwin S. Porter
Stars: Gilbert M. 'Broncho Billy' Anderson, A.C. Abadie, George Barnes
Short | Fantasy | Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

Two travellers are tormented by Satan from inn to inn and eventuly experience a buggy ride through the heavens courtesy of the Devil before he takes one of them down to hell and roasts him ... See full summary »

Director: Georges Méliès
Stars: Georges Méliès
My Winnipeg (2007)
Documentary | Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

Fact, fantasy and memory are woven seamlessly together in this portrait of film-maker Guy Maddin's home town of Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Director: Guy Maddin
Stars: Darcy Fehr, Ann Savage, Louis Negin
Short | Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Director: Tamara Mihovilovic
Stars: Jovan Vladimir Borka, Zoran Peric, Katarina Bahcuk
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

Auguste Lumière directs four workers in the demolition of an old wall at the Lumière factory. One worker is pressing the wall inwards with a jackscrew, while another is pushing it with a ... See full summary »

Director: Louis Lumière
Stars: Auguste Lumière
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

A man opens the big gates to the Lumière factory. Through the gateway and a smaller doorway beside it, workers are streaming out, turning either left or right. Most of them are women in ... See full summary »

Director: Louis Lumière
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.8/10 X  

Two men play cards, as a third watches and a waiter brings drinks. The third man pours drinks as the waiter laughs.

Director: Louis Lumière
Stars: Antoine Féraud, Antoine Lumière, Félicien Trewey
Comedy | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

A gardener is watering his flowers, when a mischievous boy sneaks up behind his back, and puts a foot on the water hose. The gardener is surprised, and looks into the nozzle to find out why... See full summary »

Director: Louis Lumière
Stars: François Clerc, Benoît Duval
Bicyclist (1896)
Documentary | Short
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.1/10 X  
Director: Louis Lumière
Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Mrs. Auguste Lumiere ...
Herself (from 'Repas de bébé (1895)') (as Mrs. Margaret Lumière)
Antoine Lumière ...
Himself - Lumières' Father, Playing Cards (from 'Partie d'écarte (1895)')
...
Himself (from 'Repas de bébé (1895)')
...
Narrator
Félicien Trewey ...
Himself - Playing Cards (from 'Partie d'écarte (1895)')
M. Winckler ...
Himself - Playing Cards (from 'Partie d'écarte (1895)')
Edit

Storyline

A collection of short films made by the Lumiere brothers, a team of pioneering filmmakers in turn-of-the-century France.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

Unrated
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:


Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Crazy Credits

Narrator Bernard Tavernier credits all others orally when they appear in the movie. See more »

Connections

Edited from Chicago Police Parade (1897) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A Means to an End
15 April 2004 | by See all my reviews

28 December 1895 is a date of memorization for film students, but was the Lumière Brothers' Cinématographe projections of 50-seconds scenes at the Grand Café in Paris the first display of cinema to a paying audience? No, the Skladanowsky brothers accomplished the feat on 1 November of the same year with their Bioskop. In the U.S., the Lathams and the partnership of Thomas Armat and C. Francis Jenkins did likewise earlier that year. Projected reproduced motion not on celluloid film strips has a history going back further. To the credit of narrator Bertrand Tavernier and to the discredit of many historians, he didn't make the claim; he even quickly acknowledged inventors preceding the Lumière Brothers. Anyhow, this film is not a documentary about the lives and accomplishment of the two, but is a compilation of their films, most of them made by Louis Lumière, or cameramen who traveled the globe. It's an excellent source for a film student.

The Cinématographe was a vast improvement upon Dickson and Edison's Kinetograph, which was immobile. The Cinématographe, however, at 7,25 kg. (16 lb.), could be taken outside of a "Black Maria"; hence, the Lumière films are called actualities. Additionally, the Cinématographe was reversible--working efficiently as a camera, projector and printer. Contemporaries also remarked on the superior quality of its projected images (although they also complained about its excessive flickering).

Besides producing better moving pictures than Edison's company and others, Louis Lumière would master such basics as directing subjects in and out of frame, distance and composition and, thanks in large part to Alexandre Promio, tracking shots, or panoramas. The panoramas consisted of placing the camera on a moving object, such as a boat or a train. One film is in a shaky camera fashion with children chasing after the camera and cameraman who are sitting in a rickshaw. Street documentation was a particular obsession, Tavernier noted. A shot of action with the Sphinx and Pyramid as background, a scene of opium smokers, and a view of a colonist throwing grains to children are some of the most interesting films, at least from a historical perspective. The Lumière company not only made interesting films by taking their camera around the world, but also introduced the world to cinema. Additionally, there is probably the first film of a filmmaker filming. In another scene, the director waves his hand within frame to usher the passerby subjects. A trick shot involving those dangerous cars, a serpentine dance, and a puppet show of a "happy skeleton" are the more cinematically challenging productions; yet, those are attempts at duplicating the innovations of others, who had by then surpassed the Lumiéres. Louis Lumière said, "The cinema is an invention without a future", but Georges Méliès and others were proving both brothers wrong when Louis was finishing his film career.

Tavernier's narration was generally a welcomed addition to watching the films, but he did exaggerate occasionally, as do many so enthusiastic about their subject. Although my favorite film of theirs, I wouldn't err as to say "Arrivee d'un train" (1895) was the first masterpiece and the first horror film. At other times, though, Tavernier gives humorous comments. To a scene of the French Army using and abusing a horse by doing disorganized gymnastics atop and into it, Tavernier remarked, "By just seeing the film, you can see why we lost so many wars." Moreover, he provides some useful information, such as a explanation of the multiple shots of factory workers leaving, and why, for apparently 95 years, historians have been incorrect about their first film made 19 March 1895. If one wants to see the films by the Lumière brothers, this is the best means to that end that I know of--not only are their most popular handful or so films available here, but their later productions (many not made by either brother) are, as well. And, the restoration and transfer are remarkably crisp.


8 of 8 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?