The captain of a ship's crew, a mouse, goes to the bar to pick up his men. After forcing the initially reluctant sailors onboard, they set sail and hit the (literal) high seas. Spots gags ... See full summary »

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(as I. Sparber)

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(story), (story)

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Cast

Uncredited cast:
Jackson Beck ...
Mouse Captain (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

The captain of a ship's crew, a mouse, goes to the bar to pick up his men. After forcing the initially reluctant sailors onboard, they set sail and hit the (literal) high seas. Spots gags abound such as a cook dumping the garbage overboard into a clam's mouth, the clam getting his revenge by climbing onboard and spraying the garbage back at the cook, and a running gag involving a bear who is splashed by his bucket of water each time he throws it overboard. Finally, we are invited to sing along to the old sea tune, "Strike Up the Band". Written by Matt Yorston <george.y@ns.sympatico.ca>

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Plot Keywords:

screen song | See All (1) »

Genres:

Animation | Short | Music

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Release Date:

28 July 1949 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Color:

(Technicolor)
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User Reviews

 
Decent Retread
3 January 2015 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

This Famous Studios Screen Song entry looks like they did it pretty much on the cheap. The featured song, "Strike Up the Band (Way for a Sailor)" had been the subject of a Fleischer Screen Song in 1930; the captain is based on Herman from the Herman and Catnip series, even though Jackson Beck voices him in full roar. The structure is about four minutes of decent blackout gags on board a ship and a couple of minutes to cover the tune. Unfortunately, the capper gag is fairly weak.

With the series' revival in 1946, this was pretty much the format that the Screen Songs took until their end. Although they were always competently done, their unvarying format and carefully paced gag structure made them less interesting than the rat-a-tat pacing of the jokes in the earlier series.


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