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The Banker's Daughter (1933)

First in a series of melodrammer-operettas, followed by "The Oil Can Mystery" and "Fanny in the Lion's Den", built around Fanny Zilch: the banker's daughter. She was born when Fanny was a ... See full summary »

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First in a series of melodrammer-operettas, followed by "The Oil Can Mystery" and "Fanny in the Lion's Den", built around Fanny Zilch: the banker's daughter. She was born when Fanny was a girl's name. The slightly-burnt toast of the town; Oil Can Harry: a deep-dyed villain but his colors run. So tough he uses spinach as a boutonnaire. Relentlessly he pursues Fanny for her beauty, wealth and streamline effect; Strongheart: a hero with a steely glint in his eye and a blush on his cheeks. They done him wrong who called him pansy and thought he couldn't shoot from the hip; Napoleon, Strongheart's Steed: a fiery charger once free from the milk route. He needs neither whip nor spur when he hears the cry of beauty in distress. Written by Les Adams ,<longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

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oil can harry | fanny zilch | See All (2) »

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You will howl at them, Hiss at them, and Hit the ceiling in laughter! (original poster)

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Animation | Short

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25 June 1933 (USA)  »

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1.37 : 1
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The Rise of Oil Can Harry
28 June 2013 | by See all my reviews

The last fifteen times I saw Oil Can Harry tie a damsel to a mill saw with much bad operetta, it was a Mighty Mouse Cartoon. Here is probably the earliest full-blown iteration of the Terrytoon, ten years before the Mouse showed up. This one I liked.

This being a Terrytoon, there were things about it I didn't care for. First, it was a cartoon about people, and therefore the use of cartooning in the effort was doubtful; why make a cartoon when you could do it live? Nor are the gags well constructed, since they are set up and their nature is revealed in the set-up: less surprise, less funny. Still, the sheer number of them more than compensates for both the later overuse of the plot and their less than stellar construction. If you don't like this joke, the next one will be along soon. The result is a good cartoon.


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