5.8/10
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187 user 86 critic

All the Pretty Horses (2000)

Two Texas cowboys head to Mexico in search of work, but soon find themselves in trouble with the law after one of them falls in love with a wealthy rancher's daughter.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay)

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ON DISC
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 2 wins & 13 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
Angelina Torres ...
Luisa (as Angelina C. Torres)
J.D. Young ...
Grandfather
...
Mother
...
J.C. Franklin
...
Cole
...
Yvette Diaz ...
Girl
Imelda Colindres ...
Girl's Mom
Augustin Solis ...
Manuel (as Agustin Solis)
...
Don Hector de la Rocha y Villarreal
Elizabeth Ibarra ...
Maria
...
Doña Alfonsa (as Miriam Colón)
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Storyline

Two young Texas cowboys on the cusp of manhood ride into 1940's Mexico in search of experience. What they find is a country as chaotic as it is beautiful, as cruel and unfeeling as it is mysterious, where death is a constant, capricious companion. Written by Richard Foxx <spiritranch@earthlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Some passions can never be tamed.

Genres:

Drama | Romance | Western

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for violence and some sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

25 December 2000 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Espíritu salvaje  »

Filming Locations:

 »

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Box Office

Budget:

$57,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,304,971, 25 December 2000, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$15,540,353, 31 December 2001

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$18,133,495, 31 December 2001
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (original cut)

Sound Mix:

| |

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Some attempts have been made to release a director's cut DVD, but arrangements cannot be reached with the composer of the film's music, Daniel Lanois. As part of the re-cut, Harvey Weinstein scrapped the original score and hired Marty Stuart. Lanois felt insulted, and has steadfastly refused to license his score (which, unusually, he owns) to any release of the film. See more »

Goofs

The Beech 18 airplane that Don Hector flies from his ranch to Mexico City every week has a US registration number beginning with "N." Aircraft registered in Mexico have registration numbers beginning with "XA," "XB" or "XC." The filmmaker seems to have been aware of this, since most shots of the airplane have the "N" on the fuselage partially blocked by a car or person. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
John Grady Cole: You ever think about dyin'?
Lacey: Yeah. You?
John Grady Cole: Yeah.
Lacey: So, you think there's a heaven?
John Grady Cole: Yeah. Don't you?
Lacey: I don't know. Yeah, maybe. You think you can believe there's a heaven if you don't believe in hell?
John Grady Cole: I guess you can believe what you want to.
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Crazy Credits

In the opening credits, the Columbia Pictures emblem is not the 2000 one. Instead, it is the circa 1949 version with the woman holding the torch. This is what would have been used at the time the story is set. See more »

Connections

Featured in The Jay Leno Show: Episode #1.44 (2009) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Might have been a masterpiece
25 December 2000 | by See all my reviews

ALL THE PRETTY HORSES is quite effective, though there are some serious gaping holes in the story. The story and characters insist that John Cole and Alejandra have fallen in love; we only get to see a swift montage of sex-making, which is not the same thing at all. Damon made me believe that John was in love through the sheer force of his acting, but the audience needed to be courted along in this romance. Also, Lacey Rawlins at one point crucially (suicidally?) antagonizes a fellow in prison, and we have no idea what bad blood has been brewing between these two.

There are stories about how Thornton's film was first cut at four hours, then the director agreed to deliver a three hour version. The financing studio balked at the length and sold it off to Miramax, who contractually required a cut no longer than two and a quarter hours. What is left runs 117 minutes. What happened? Twenty minutes would have certainly helped smooth out the few rough spots, and a two-and-a-half hour or three hour movie might have been some sort of masterpiece. As it is, some of the epic sweep is contained and the film remains remarkably moving, but may wind up ultimately not finding its commercial or artistic audience because of the compromises. A shame.


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