5.8/10
11,905
188 user 86 critic

All the Pretty Horses (2000)

Two Texas cowboys head to Mexico in search of work, but soon find themselves in trouble with the law after one of them falls in love with a wealthy rancher's daughter.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay)

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ON DISC
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 2 wins & 13 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
Angelina Torres ...
Luisa (as Angelina C. Torres)
J.D. Young ...
Grandfather
...
Mother
...
J.C. Franklin
...
Cole
...
Yvette Diaz ...
Girl
Imelda Colindres ...
Girl's Mom
Augustin Solis ...
Manuel (as Agustin Solis)
...
Don Hector de la Rocha y Villarreal
Elizabeth Ibarra ...
Maria
...
Doña Alfonsa (as Miriam Colón)
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Storyline

Two young Texas cowboys on the cusp of manhood ride into 1940's Mexico in search of experience. What they find is a country as chaotic as it is beautiful, as cruel and unfeeling as it is mysterious, where death is a constant, capricious companion. Written by Richard Foxx <spiritranch@earthlink.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Some passions can never be tamed.

Genres:

Drama | Romance | Western

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for violence and some sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

25 December 2000 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Espíritu salvaje  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Budget:

$57,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$4,860,556 (USA) (29 December 2000)

Gross:

$15,527,125 (USA) (11 February 2001)
 »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (original cut)

Sound Mix:

| |

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The movie's title comes from the lyrics of a traditional American folk song. See more »

Goofs

When the three (Cole, Rawlins, and Blevins) are preparing to cross into Mexico, they stop to view the Rio Grande from an elevated position. The Rio Grande is flowing left to right, which, from any point in Texas facing Mexico, would be the opposite direction of the river's actual flow. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
John Grady Cole: You ever think about dyin'?
Lacey: Yeah. You?
John Grady Cole: Yeah.
Lacey: So, you think there's a heaven?
John Grady Cole: Yeah. Don't you?
Lacey: I don't know. Yeah, maybe. You think you can believe there's a heaven if you don't believe in hell?
John Grady Cole: I guess you can believe what you want to.
See more »

Crazy Credits

In the opening credits, the Columbia Pictures emblem is not the 2000 one. Instead, it is the circa 1949 version with the woman holding the torch. This is what would have been used at the time the story is set. See more »

Connections

Referenced in E! True Hollywood Story: Winona Ryder (2002) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
The 35% movie that maybe originally was a minor classic?
9 January 2011 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

All the Pretty Horses is directed by Billy Bob Thornton and adapted from Cormac McCarthy's novel of the name name by Ted Tally. It stars Matt Damon, Penélope Cruz, Henry Thomas & Lucas Black. Marty Stuart scores the music and Barry Markowitz photographs it. Plot finds Damon as John Grady Cole, a young cowboy who travels with his best friend, Lacey Rawlings, from Texas across the border into Mexico. It's a journey that sees acquaintances come and go, love blossom and the harshness of the world become all too real to such young eyes.

A big financial disaster for Columbia Pictures and Miramax Films who lost nearly $40 million on the film. Serves them right I say, for Thornton's original cut was a long epic piece thought to be around three and a half hours in length. But good old Harvey Weinstein demanded drastic cuts to be made and Thornton had to trim it to just nearly two hours in running time. That's a lot of story gone astray, and boy does it show, no wonder Damon himself bitterly commented that to lose 35% of your movie ultimately leaves you with a completely different film. It's such a shame because although it's now a film chocked with flaws and flow problems, one can see that in its original cut there had to be at worst an involving rites-of-passage story.

So what are we left with? Well it's certainly not a donkey. It drips with period atmosphere and comes resplendent with a poetic beauty thanks to Markowitz's photography. Stuart's score too has the tone absolutely right, blending the old feel of the West with evocative arrangements for the more tender moments involving the protagonists: and there are tender moments, notably between Cole (Damon youthful but not really exuding a naivety for the age of the character) & Rawlings (Thomas effective and dominating his scenes). That the crucial relationship between Cole and Alejandra Villarreal (Cruz weak and lacking believability for the romantic strand) is barely formed can be laid at Weinstein's door. So too can the fact that a number of characters file in and out with blink and you miss them parts, sad when it's the likes of Robert Patrick and Sam Sheperd; and tragic in the case of Bruce Dern's judge; the latter of which is a crucial character in the final quarter but gets about three minutes screen time. Madness. Star of the movie is Black, who as young ruffian Blevins, manages to convey a deep sense of vulnerability. It's a critical role, one that affects the main character's lives, and thanks to Black's spirited performance we anxiously await what fate has in store for the lovable rogue.

So much good to sample, then, even if it feels like going out for a three course dinner and finding the main course is no longer available. It's hoped that one day we may get a directors cut from Thornton, only then you feel will All the Pretty Horses be revealed as a potential thoroughbred. 6/10


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