The fox is gaily driving down the highway on his motor-scooter. The Crow, using his "Sucker Detector", spots the Fox as an obvious sucker. He goes to work disguising a free public bridge as... See full summary »

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Cast

Uncredited cast:
Frank Graham ...
Fox / Crow (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

The fox is gaily driving down the highway on his motor-scooter. The Crow, using his "Sucker Detector", spots the Fox as an obvious sucker. He goes to work disguising a free public bridge as a "toll bridge" passing himself off as the toll man. The fox doesn't want to pay the two dollars and attempts to cross to the other side without paying. He tries going across on a raft but the crow attaches it to an anchor. He tries using a "roller-coaster" ramp but the crow detaches it. Lastly, he tries driving underwater using an oxygen tank but the Crow replaces it with a helium tank sending the Fox skyward. Finally, the fox pays the $2.00 at which point the Crow reveals himself, yelling, "Sucker!"... but Foxy gets even. Written by Matt Yorston <george.y@ns.sympatico.ca>

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27 November 1942 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Columbia Color Rhapsody No. 4503: Toll Bridge Troubles  »

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1.37 : 1
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Connections

Followed by Plenty Below Zero (1943) See more »

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Pay the Two Dollars
17 December 2014 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

The Fox wants to bicycle across a bridge, but the Crow paints a "Toll Bridge" sign to mooch some money in this funny cartoon from Screen Gems.

The Fox & Crow series was invented by Frank Tashlin during his brief period as head of Columbia's animation studio. Although the movie series lasted into the late 1940s, DC comics bought the print rights and was still producing new issues in the late 1960s; not that I ever bought any of those kiddie comics.

Still, the animation series was pretty good, with some nicely defined characters and some fine gag sequences. This one was produced by Dave Fleischer and he always liked to cram as many gags into a cartoon as possible.


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