5.9/10
8
2 user

Sing as You Swing (1937)

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Charles Clapham ...
Himself (as Clapham & Dwyer)
Bill Dwyer ...
Himself (as Clapham & Dwyer)
Claude Dampier ...
Pomphrey Featherstone-Chaw
Billie Carlyle
The Mills Brothers ...
Themselves (as The Four Mills Brothers)
Evelyn Dall ...
Cora Fane
Mantovani ...
Himself (as Mantovani and his Tipica Orchestra)
Lu Ann Meredith ...
Sally Bevan (as Lu Anne Meredith)
Brian Lawrance ...
Jimmy King
Carol Chilton ...
Herself (as Chilton & Thomas)
Maceo Thomas ...
Himself (as Chilton & Thomas)
Nat Gonella ...
Himself
Beryl Orde ...
Herself
H.F. Maltby
Edward Ashley ...
Harrington
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Storyline

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Genres:

Musical

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Details

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Release Date:

17 January 1938 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Let the People Laugh  »

Company Credits

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 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Marconi's Visatone System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Edited into Swing Tease (1940) See more »

Soundtracks

Nagasaki
Written by Harry Warren and Mort Dixon
Sung by The Mills Brothers
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User Reviews

 
Cobbled together variety show tests endurance but features a couple of important acts
20 December 2015 | by (London) – See all my reviews

This is a line-up of whatever variety acts happened to be available during the week of production. The classiest performers are the American quartet The Mills Brothers (who do their impressions of a dance band) and jazz man Nat Gonella. They're thrown together with radio favourites such as impersonator Beryl Orde (her impressions include Gracie Fields, Mabel Constanduros and Mae West) and conductor Mantovani, whose orchestra is in gypsy costumes. The performances are linked with God-awful comic business by three more radio turns, the often incomprehensible Clapham and Dwyer and silly ass Claude Dampier, who does at least have comic timing. It's surprising to find two writers credited for the script since what little narrative exists is completely incoherent. (This may be because the version currently showing on British TV runs well under an hour, not 82 minutes as listed here). The final sequence consists of a broadcast on the new-fangled television, but no TV cameras are in evidence.


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