This volume of the series explores the roots of Rock 'n' Roll as a musical genre.

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This volume of the series explores the roots of Rock 'n' Roll as a musical genre.

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6 March 1995 (USA)  »

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Follows The History of Rock 'n' Roll: Guitar Heroes (1995) See more »

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Series Gets Off To An interesting Start
3 March 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

In the opening segment of this first-of- 10 episode set, a bunch of recording artists describe rock 'n roll.

I like best what guitarist Rick Osasek of "The Cars" said: "Juvenile delinquents played rock 'n roll in the '50s and wore leather jackets; in the '60s hippies played it; in the '70s there was juvenile delinquents but that was an old word so they called it 'punk;' then they cleaned it up with New Wave and they put on a tie ......but it's all about music and songs, ya know? Whatever songs are popular at the time."

For the remainder of the hour, we see and hear presentations by a number of singers, some extremely famous like Michael Jackson, Bruce Springsteen, The Rolling Stones ('64 - wow does Mick Jagger look young!), Jimi Hendrix and more.

Personally, the ones I enjoyed the most were Elvis Presley singing "Money Honey;" Muddy Waters doing "Got My Mojo Working;" Buddy Holly on "That'll Be The Day;" Little Richard doing a gospel number and later "Ready Teddy;" Ruth Brown's "Mama, He Treats Your Daughter Mean;" Louis Jordan's "Caledonia;" Joe Turner's "Shake, Rattle and Roll;" Ray Charles on "I Got A Woman;" Chuck Berry's "Mabelline;' Pat Boone doing "Tutti Fruitti," and Billy Haley and The Comets, "Rock Around The Clock."

I thought I knew R&R history but had forgotten that Jordan was the real "father of rock 'n roll" in the 1940s. I was surprised to hear Jagger say he and Kieth Richards liked country music as much as blues. Speaking of the British, it was a bit shocking to see how Bill Haley was so big in England, provoking riots and everything!

The longest and nicest tribute in here was for Ray Charles, who could sing anything and make it sound special.


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