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9 out of 9 people found the following review useful:

Live-action Saturday morning program produced by Krofft Brothers - a lot of fun.

Author: jimmyshine from United States
21 April 2001

Unavailable now on television, this was a later entry for the Krofft company, and quite fun. The on-location filming was a big plus, and the stories, while of course far-fetched, were exciting for kids. A lot of innocent fun - something that's sadly lacking in today's kids entertainment market.

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4 out of 4 people found the following review useful:

Deliciously cheesy 70's Saturday morning Sid and Marty Krofft kidvid lunacy

8/10
Author: Woodyanders (Woodyanders@aol.com) from The Last New Jersey Drive-In on the Left
14 January 2007

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

For sublimely silly Sasquatch Saturday morning live action entertainment, there's only one show to see. Yep, it's this supremely screwy 70's TV series from Sid and Marty Krofft, those undisputed kings of such Me Decade kidvid insanity as "Land of the Lost" and "Sigmund and the Sea Monsters." Eight years ago Bigfoot (brawny thespian Ray Young; the evil acidhead who freaks out in the disco in Jeff Lieberman's terrific "Blue Sunshine") discovered a lost male child in the Great Northwest wilderness of Southern California (!) and raised the tyke to be a Tarzan-like lad called Wildboy (Joseph Butcher, your basic vapid blonde Malibu surfer type).

With his unruly mass of all-body hair and bulky, beefy build, Bigfoot resembles one of three things: 1) Chewbacca's brother, 2) a really hairy hippie, or 3) Greg Allman on a very bad day. Furthermore, Bigfoot speaks in barely coherent grunt'n'grumble tones, delivering a message about nature and the environment at the end of every show. He tosses rinky-dink paper mache boulders as if they were rinky-dink paper mache boulders. He survives avalanches without a scratch. And he runs and leaps in hilariously drawn-out slow motion ala Lee Majors in "The Six Million Dollar Man" while groovy-chillin' music and funky synthesized sound effects accompany his every move. Naturally, Bigfoot and Wildboy have many exciting misadventures: they foil plutonium thieves, battle a mummy, encounter alien beings, and face off with a red-skinned "Incredible Hulk"-style monster (played by Carel Struycken, who later become a regular on "Twin Peaks" and portrayed Lurch in the "Adams Family" films). Wildboy frequently gets captured by baddies and Bigfoot has to save his hapless'n'helpless wimpy hide time and time again. Sure, this show is undeniably a dippy hunk of total cheese, but it's the program's very blatant and abundant cheesiness which makes it a topflight tacky treasure.

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2 out of 5 people found the following review useful:

Something Differnent From the Kroffts

Author: Brian Washington (Sargebri@att.net) from Los Angeles, California
21 April 2003

This show was a different kind of show for the Krofft brothers. It wasn't as trippy as most of their creations and it was fairly close to being a straight adventure series. It also had a twist where the kid partner was the leader and the so-called adult was the sidekick. Another thing that I liked about the show was that it was videotaped rather than filmed which made I think that gave it more of an edge than most of the Krofft shows.

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