A student commits suicide out of unhappy love to a married man; story is recounted in retrospective by a "judge" who asks the audience to decide who is the guilty party.

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(screenplay), (play) | 2 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Marie Tomásová ...
Lída Matysová
...
Dr. Petr Petrus
...
Milan Stibor
...
Pán v taláru
...
Dr. Lída Petrusová
...
Matysová
...
Stiborová
Alena Kreuzmannová ...
Majka
...
Tenor
...
Dekan
Frantisek Vnoucek ...
Poslanec
Tatána Vavrincová ...
Sekretárka
Frantisek Miska ...
dr. Král
Milka Balek-Brodská ...
Správcová
...
Student - sprýmar
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Storyline

A student commits suicide out of unhappy love to a married man; story is recounted in retrospective by a "judge" who asks the audience to decide who is the guilty party.

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Drama

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Release Date:

2 October 1959 (Czechoslovakia)  »

Also Known As:

Apassionata  »

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Connections

Version of Rotsa aseti sikvarulia (1958) See more »

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Little known Czech film is worth seeing
16 January 2008 | by (Buenos Aires, Argentina) – See all my reviews

This little known (pre new wave) Czech movie starts with a judge looking for a certain file. When he finds it, suddenly a story comes to life: the suicide of law student Lida. We see Lida's troubled love life, having to choose between her fiancée, computer engineer Milan, and her lover, her law professor, Petr (a married man). Meanwhile, the judge appears throughout, judging the characters and their decisions(especially Lida). He is omnipresent and he seems like the embodiment (whether consciously or not by the director) of a ruler in a totalitarian society. The film is in the socialist realist tradition, though its use of a complicated scheme of flashbacks makes it somewhat unconventional. It is a bit dated, though also somewhat daring for its time. Not a great film, but worth seeing if you are interested in the cinema of Eastern Europe.


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