6.7/10
47,687
268 user 124 critic

The Legend of Bagger Vance (2000)

PG-13 | | Drama, Fantasy, Sport | 3 November 2000 (USA)
A down-and-out golfer attempts to recover his game and his life with help from a mystical caddy.

Director:

Writers:

(novel), (screenplay)
Reviews
Popularity
4,202 ( 1,566)

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
2 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Neskaloosa
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Spec Hammond
Trip Hamilton ...
Frank Greaves
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Dougal McDermott
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John Invergordon
Danny Nelson ...
McManus
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Laidlaw

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Storyline

A disillusioned war veteran, Captain Rannulph Junuh, reluctantly agrees to play a game of golf. He finds the game futile until his caddy, Bagger Vance, teaches him the secret of the authentic golf stroke which turns out also to be the secret to mastering any challenge and finding meaning in life. Written by M. Fowler

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Some Things Can't Be Learned. They Must Be Remembered. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Fantasy | Sport

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

3 November 2000 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

La légende de Bagger Vance  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$80,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$11,516,712 (USA) (3 November 2000)

Gross:

$30,695,227 (USA) (5 January 2001)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| |

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film cast includes three Oscar winners: Matt Damon, Charlize Theron, and Jack Lemmon; and one Oscar nominee: Will Smith. See more »

Goofs

In the final round, Junuh is wearing a collared shirt and tie. However, on the 18th hole, his shirt suddenly has no collar and he has no tie. See more »

Quotes

Walter Hagen: Hey, I admire the way you're dealing with this match, Junuh. Fighting the way you are. It's damn noble. But no matter how good a fighter you are, just remember, I can ask they King to gold the flag for me when I putt, but he's not going to give me his crown, neither is Bobby and neither am I.
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Crazy Credits

The DreamWorks logo, the 20th Century Fox logo, and the opening credits are all silent when the film opens, except for the sound of the wind and crickets of the golf course. See more »

Connections

Featured in Hollywood's Top Ten: Par for the Course (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Mood Indigo
Written by Duke Ellington, Barney Bigard and Irving Mills
Performed by Duke Ellington
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
The best movie I've seen to become present yourself
4 October 2011 | by (Tilburg, The Netherlands) – See all my reviews

You know, there's basically only two ways you can watch movies. You either use them as food for the thinking mind, or you simply sit back and see where it takes you, as if it's the first thing you've ever seen.

In the first way, your mind generates expectations of what it will get to consume. Then it will be presented its food for consumption, and it will start up its filters in order to judge whether the food is good or bad. And every time you think you can fit it with a negative label, you will gladly make known that you made that recognition.

In the other way, you enter the movie fully and openly, without expectations. And as the experience unfolds, you feel into the characters and relate it to your own being.

From the first perspective, this movie is not very good. It's slow, a bit airy-fairy, and the plot quite boring. Your mind will probably already know what's going to happen all the time, and find plenty of negative labels it can paste onto the movie. On to the next one, the next thing to consume, it will tell you.

From the other perspective, this is one of the best movies if not the best ever created in the history of humanity, if you ask me. It gradually unfolds into showing how R. Junuh (Matt Damon) becomes more present in where he is, as he makes crucial steps in his mind and lets go of the baggage that remains inside of it. By following this process and relating to it ourselves, this movie is a wonderful tool for becoming more present and being masterful in whatever we happen to be doing in our own lives.

Bagger Vance (Will Smith) basically tells that the only thing that Junuh can do in order to win this game of golf is let go of his thoughts. The thoughts that tell him who he is or should be in relation to others, what he feels about the present 'situation', or what he needs to do in order to succeed. He learns that he needs to simply drop that self-centeredness, essentially that whining child inside, and let the moment that is already there take him over instead of his mind.

By doing so ourselves during the movie, we might become more present too as our thoughts fade to the background and as we become more aware of what's going on around us, instead of being absorbed only in what's going on inside the screen, behind the electronic window. We can get into that state where we feel our environment, where we drop all mental baggage, and where we can simply excel in what we do, whatever it is that apparently wants to be done through us. We can remember how it was before all the mental conditioning started somewhere in our childhood, and become present again. That's the real potential of this movie, the experience it can drag you into. Which is much better than a temporary pleasure, if you ask me.

And is that not the only thing to do in this game we call life? Is that not the ultimate teaching that the Bhagavad Gita and ultimately the mystical branches of all religions point to? In this movie, it's not Bagger Vance that awakens R. Junuh, it simply all happens pretty much independently of anything, in the true experiential recognition of itself. And that's really all we need to know, and the limit of all that we can really get from any type of immersion in media content.


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