An entry in the Aesops Fables cartoon series in which the hero finds himself in a saloon where various entertainers warble old songs, in which the saloon barflies meet with cheers and tears... See full summary »
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An entry in the Aesops Fables cartoon series in which the hero finds himself in a saloon where various entertainers warble old songs, in which the saloon barflies meet with cheers and tears and applaud loudly, or meet with disdain by tossing their beer-mugs at the performers. Then a big, bad outlaw shows up with a bad attitude and intentions. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

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saloon | cheer | tears | barfly | beer mug | See All (30) »

Genres:

Animation | Short

Certificate:

Passed
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Release Date:

26 October 1931 (USA)  »

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Almost plot less short strung together by singing and a few decent gags
3 September 2015 | by (Tucson AZ) – See all my reviews

This is a one-shot cartoon produced by Van Beuren studio. Even though there isn't much here to spoil, there will be spoilers ahead:

Even for an early Van Beuren effort, this is pretty thin. There's just the barest whisper of a plot and even that comes in toward the end of the cartoon! This appears to have been made to have some old songs sung in a saloon, with the songs separated by some very tired gags for the most part.

Music, as I said, is the largest part of this and some of it is appreciated and some is not. It's a tough crowd in a rough room. A very spirited musical number begins with four banjo players outside the saloon and then moves inside, where a band of sorts is playing.

After that, a quartet sings a very downbeat song about a failed love which saddens and angers the crowd, which starts throwing things at the singers. Then, someone knocks out the piano player and the first halfway funny gag happens. I won't spoil that here.

Next is the first indication that this is a pre-Code cartoon, as a fey duck sashays up to sing "Listen To the Mockingbird", which doesn't go over well. The joke extends when the duck kisses a tough looking cowboy on the cheek and he starts singing something melancholy and tender. He then gets hit by a bottle and goes down to the floor.

Then comes a strange dancing number which is also comparatively off-color for 1931. This is followed by two drunks sitting at a table, one singing, "She's More To Be Pitied than Censured". It's rather odd. There's a drunk in a kilt or a skirt who looks like he's kicked out of the saloon by a table.

Five minutes in, the "plot" such as it is, starts, when the villain comes in, guns drawn, to steal the "free lunch". Given that there's less than two minutes left, the plot isn't much anyway, but I won't spoil the ending except to say that the bad guy's horse is the most interesting character in the cartoon.

For completeists only.


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