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Adult Swim Sets Comedy Projects With Jena Friedman, Derrick Beckles & Eric Andre

Adult Swim Sets Comedy Projects With Jena Friedman, Derrick Beckles & Eric Andre
A new special from comedian Jena Friedman and series Mostly 4 Millennials from Derrick Beckles and Eric Andre were announced by Adult Swim today. Friedman has worked as a correspondent for National Geographic Explorer and Vice, and was a field producer for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and writer for Late Show with David Letterman. She’s appeared on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore, @Midnight the Netflix mocumentary…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Watch: Sneak Peek of Missing Dial's Explosive Finale, When 'Everything Is Turned on Its End,' says Investigator

Watch: Sneak Peek of Missing Dial's Explosive Finale, When 'Everything Is Turned on Its End,' says Investigator
After months of trekking through the Costa Rican jungle looking for their missing son, Peggy and Roman Dial believe they finally know what happened to the 27-year-old explorer when he vanished in 2014.

Roman, whose exhaustive quest to find out what happened to Cody has been featured in the National Geographic Channel's true crime series Missing Dial, told ABC's Nightline Friday that he now believes his son died at the hands of the jungle.

Cody's remains were found deep in the jungles of the Corcovado National Park on May 19, along with his passport and $30. Costa Rican authorities say they believe
See full article at People.com - TV Watch »

Sneak Peek of Missing Dial's Explosive Finale, When 'Everything Is Turned on Its End,' says Investigator

  • PEOPLE.com
Sneak Peek of Missing Dial's Explosive Finale, When 'Everything Is Turned on Its End,' says Investigator
After months of trekking through the Costa Rican jungle looking for their missing son, Peggy and Roman Dial believe they finally know what happened to the 27-year-old explorer when he vanished in 2014. Roman, whose exhaustive quest to find out what happened to Cody has been featured in the National Geographic Channel's true crime series Missing Dial, told ABC's Nightline Friday that he now believes his son died at the hands of the jungle. Cody's remains were found deep in the jungles of the Corcovado National Park on May 19, along with his passport and $30. Costa Rican authorities say they believe
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Sneak Peek of Missing Dial's Explosive Finale, When 'Everything Is Turned on Its End,' says Investigator

  • PEOPLE.com
Sneak Peek of Missing Dial's Explosive Finale, When 'Everything Is Turned on Its End,' says Investigator
After months of trekking through the Costa Rican jungle looking for their missing son, Peggy and Roman Dial believe they finally know what happened to the 27-year-old explorer when he vanished in 2014. Roman, whose exhaustive quest to find out what happened to Cody has been featured in the National Geographic Channel's true crime series Missing Dial, told ABC's Nightline Friday that he now believes his son died at the hands of the jungle. Cody's remains were found deep in the jungles of the Corcovado National Park on May 19, along with his passport and $30. Costa Rican authorities say they believe
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Watch: Legendary Explorer Roman Dial and His Investigators Clash Over Who Might Have Killed His Son in Sneak Peek of Missing Dial

  • PEOPLE.com
Watch: Legendary Explorer Roman Dial and His Investigators Clash Over Who Might Have Killed His Son in Sneak Peek of Missing Dial
Famed explorer Roman Dial and his wife, Peggy Dial, are getting closer to finding out what happened to their 27-year-old son, Cody, who vanished in the Costa Rican jungle in 2014. But it's not going as smoothly as they anticipated. Missing Dial, the National Geographic Channel's six-part, true crime documentary series, follows the Alaskan couple and the two investigators they hired as they search for clues about Cody's mysterious disappearance in one of the world's most dangerous jungles. Roman is the legendary National Geographic Explorer and adventurer who taught his son how to survive in the wilderness and is doing
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Wacth: Legendary Explorer Roman Dial and His Investigators Clash Over Who Might Have Killed His Son in Sneak Peek of Missing Dial

  • PEOPLE.com
Wacth: Legendary Explorer Roman Dial and His Investigators Clash Over Who Might Have Killed His Son in Sneak Peek of Missing Dial
Famed explorer Roman Dial and his wife, Peggy Dial, are getting closer to finding out what happened to their 27-year-old son, Cody, who vanished in the Costa Rican jungle in 2014. But it's not going as smoothly as they anticipated. Missing Dial, the National Geographic Channel's six-part, true crime documentary series, follows the Alaskan couple and the two investigators they hired as they search for clues about Cody's mysterious disappearance in one of the world's most dangerous jungles. Roman is the legendary National Geographic Explorer and adventurer who taught his son how to survive in the wilderness and is doing
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Human Remains Found in Costa Rican Jungle Could Belong to Cody Dial, His Father Reveals

  • PEOPLE.com
On Thursday, just three days before the premiere of the National Geographic Channel's new true-crime series, Missing Dial, Roman and Peggy Dial got word that authorities had found human remains in the Costa Rican jungle - near where they believe their 27-year-old son, Cody, went missing in 2014. Now they may get the answers about their son's mysterious disappearance they have waited for all this time - answers they never hoped they would have to hear. "It is with profound sadness and incredibly mixed emotions that I can say my son’s remains have likely been found," Roman tells People exclusively.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Body Found in Costa Rican Jungle Could Belong to Cody Dial, His Father Reveals

On Thursday, just three days before the premiere of the National Geographic Channel's New True-Crime Series, Missing Dial, Roman and Peggy Dial got word that authorities had found a body in the Costa Rican jungle - near where they believe their 27-year-old son went missing in 2014. Now they may get the answers about his mysterious disappearance they have waited for all this time - but answers ones they never hoped they would have to hear. "It is with profound sadness and incredibly mixed emotions that I can say my son’s remains have likely been found," Roman Dial tells People exclusively.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Cody Dial's Mysterious Disappearance in the Costa Rican Jungle Focus of New True-Crime Series Missing Dial

  • PEOPLE.com
Roman and Peggy Dial want answers. On July 10, 2014, the Alaskan couple's 27-year-old son, Cody Dial, an experienced outdoorsman, set out to trek through the jungles of Costa Rica's lush but treacherous Corcovado National Park. The day before he left, he sent an email to his parents from an Internet café, joking that since he would be hiking between the park's main trail and the coastline, that, "It should be difficult to get lost forever." That was the last time Roman and Peggy, ever heard from their son. "He is on our minds 24 hours a day," says Peggy. "The only time
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Cody Dial's Mysterious Disappearance in the Costa Rican Jungle Focus of New True-Crime Series Missing Dial

  • PEOPLE.com
Roman and Peggy Dial want answers. On July 10, 2014, the Alaskan couple's 27-year-old son, Cody Dial, an experienced outdoorsman, set out to trek through the jungles of Costa Rica's lush but treacherous Corcovado National Park. The day before he left, he sent an email to his parents from an Internet café, joking that since he would be hiking between the park's main trail and the coastline, that, "It should be difficult to get lost forever." That was the last time Roman and Peggy, ever heard from their son. "He is on our minds 24 hours a day," says Peggy. "The only time
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Wonderful UK Trailer For Documentary ‘Planetary’ – Released On Earth Day

If you’re like me and in awe of all things that take a wider look at our Earth and everything on it, then I’m pretty sure this documentary Planetary will find you with utterly interesting times.

The film is set to mix stunning imagery with interviews from renowned experts including astronauts Ron Garan and Mae Jemison (the first African American woman in space), celebrated environmentalist Bill McKibben, National Book Award winner Barry Lopez, anthropologist Wade Davis, to National Geographic Explorer Elizabeth Lindsey, and Head of the Tibetan Buddhist Kagyu school, the 17th Karmapa who shed new light on the ways our worldview is profoundly affecting life on our planet. That’s a stunning line-up with so much to share and say.

Planetary is released globally on Vimeo and in cinemas this Earth Day, April 22nd. Watch the trailer now and check their official site for more details here: weareplanetary.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Leonardo DiCaprio's Neck Beard is Mesmerizing

Leonardo DiCaprio's Neck Beard is Mesmerizing
For the love of God, Just Shave.

Does this picture of a bearded Leonardo DiCaprio have you wishing for his baby-faced, clean-cut days?

Leo, 39, hosted a screening of the Netflix documentary Mission Blue on Wednesday in West Hollywood, Calif., where he posed with National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Sylvia Earle.

Photos: Hollywood's Sexiest Shirtless Men

Slicking his hair back into a ponytail, he also gave us a look at this impressive facial hair, which as you can see in the picture below taken at his foundation's recent inaugural gala, has even infiltrated his neck.

Now let's just take a second to remember Leo in The Wolf of Wall Street, which came out on Christmas last year.

Safe to say, facial hair just isn't for everyone.

Video: Carey Mulligan Dishes on Kissing Leonardo DiCaprio

... Hey, we can't all be Bradley Cooper right?
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Jsw Foundation, National Geographic Explorer and eminent poet Gulzar join hands for Environmental Education

Jsw Foundation and National Geographic Explorer today hosted an event focused on the imperatives for engaging science and environmental education for today’s young minds. Dr. Francis Downey, Vice President & Publisher, National Geographic Explorer emphasised the relevance and importance of the ‘Explorer’ learning platform. Also at the event, India’s greatest poet and lyricist, Shri Gulzar launched his new book of poems on the environment.

Mrs. Sangita Jindal, Chairperson, Jsw Foundation, said “As an organization, our sole motive for this event is to encourage dialogue and patronize like-minded organizations and take another step to the cause of climate change and enable a platform for debate on the ways and means to save the environment. We will be introducing the National Geographic Explorer program in all of our Jvm schools to encourage awareness for Mother Earth and the importance of conservation.”

Dr. Downey added, “This is a great opportunity for National Geographic Explorer
See full article at Bollyspice »

Netflix Adds Three Docus Including ‘The Battered Bastards Of Baseball’

Netflix plans to debut three original documentaries over the next few months. First up is The Battered Bastards Of Baseball. It chronicles how in 1973 Bonanza actor Bing Russell formed what at the time was America’s sole independent baseball team. Seen as a real-life version of the Bad News Bears, the Mavericks lasted three years before they were pushed out of Portland by the return of the major-league-backed Portland Beavers. The pic was co-directed by Chapman Way and Maclain Way, produced by Juliana Lembi, exec produced by Nancy Schafer and includes cast members Kurt Russell (Bing Russell’s son) and Todd Fields. It’s set to premiere July 11 on Netflix. Also on the slate is Mission Blue. It tells the story of legendary oceanographer, marine biologist, environmentalist and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Sylvia Earle and her impassioned campaign to save the world’s oceans from modern threats like climate change,
See full article at Deadline TV »

'James Cameron's DeepSea Challenge 3D' Gets August Release

'James Cameron's DeepSea Challenge 3D' Gets August Release
DisruptiveLA, a cutting-edge marketing and distribution company for filmed entertainment, has acquired the Us Distribution Rights to the feature documentary James Cameron's DeepSea Challenge 3D, directed by John Bruno, Andrew Wight and Ray Quint. A film about determination, danger and the ocean's greatest depths, James Cameron's DeepSea Challenge 3D tells the story of Cameron's journey to fulfill his boyhood dream of becoming an explorer. The movie offers a unique insight into Cameron's world as he makes that dream reality - and makes history - by becoming the first person to travel solo to the deepest point on the planet.

"Filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron emerges from the DeepSea Challenger submersible after his successful solo dive to the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean. The dive was part of DeepSea Challenge, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Watch The World Of…Documentary Series for Free on FilmOn

  • ShockYa
Watch The World Of…Documentary Series for Free on FilmOn
“The World Of…” documentary series is available for free viewing on FilmOn! “The World Of…” consists of 27 amazing documentaries produced by the pioneer of the “National Geographic Explorer” specials. The documentaries show its viewers adventure and nature from around the world. Here’s more you can expect from this documentary series: “Welcome to the world of mystery and adventure, of risk and inspiration, of spirit and danger. This unprecedented series takes you to the far corners of the globe, to explore the secrets of nature and wildlife, the frontiers of science and technology, the compelling questions of history and the world we live in.” You can watch this documentary series [ Read More ]

The post Watch The World Of…Documentary Series for Free on FilmOn appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Alec Baldwin watches National Geographic because 'I am a grown man'

Alec Baldwin returns to TV Friday (June 14) in a more serious role, as the host of National Geographic's programming block "Night of Exploration."

"What happens is you do some of these, and you are done with it," he says. Baldwin had just taped the season's worth of introductions and was at The Explorer's Club, the National Geographic Society's Manhattan headquarters.

"I don't necessarily want to be a cable channel prestige documentary host," Baldwin says. "I don't necessarily want to get locked into a certain kind of work. I did 'Great Migrations' for National Geographic and 'Frozen Planet' for Discovery."

"I thought I was done with that and then they called with this," he continues. "This was an honor."

It's National Geographic's 125th anniversary and Baldwin will host other shows throughout the year.

Despite his seven years on "30 Rock," getting his first break on "The Doctors" and doing so much TV,
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Argo, Silver Linings Playbook And Brave Win Big At 63rd Annual Ace Eddie Awards

“Argo” (edited by William Goldenberg, A.C.E.) and “The Silver Linings Playbook” (edited byJay Cassidy, A.C.E. and Crispin Struthers) won Best Edited Feature Film (Dramatic) and Best Edited Feature Film (Comedy/Musical) respectively at the 63rd Annual Ace Eddie Awards tonight where trophies were handed out in ten (10) categories of film, television and documentaries.

The black-tie ceremony was held in the International Ballroom of the Beverly Hilton Hotel with over 1,000 in attendance to celebrate the year’s best editing. “Brave” (edited by Nicholas C. Smith, A.C.E. & Robert Grahamjones, A.C.E.) won Best Edited Animated Feature Film and “Searching For Sugar Man” (edited by Malik Bendjelloul) won Best Edited Documentary (Feature).

Television winners included ”Nurse Jackie – Handle Your Scandle” (edited by Gary Levy) for Best Edited Half-Hour Series for Television, “Breaking Bad – Dead Freight” (edited by Skip MacDonald, A.C.E.) for Best Edited One-Hour Series for Commercial television,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Kon Tiki - A Beautiful Voyage ... Into Divine Madness

When I was a boy in New York City I remember being enthralled by a book published then by a young Norwegian 'Explorer' called Thor Heyerdahl about his travels into the vast Pacific. The book told of an impossible dream of Heyerdahl to drift by raft from off Peru, not really navigating but being carried by natural currents into the depths of the Pacific vastness to 'discover', as did thousands of years before by the ancient Tiki people of Peru, islands in the Pacific where they settled and populated. Heyerdahl was derided and discouraged in his plans to 're-enact' the ancient voyages and prove his crazy theory. Of course he was right and he did completely prove his outlandish theories to be correct. But what a trip!! And that is the tale this wonderful new film tells.... Of a group of 'mad' (or eccentric) young Norwegian men who want to sail into fate and make their mark on the world. And they are led by the biggest madman of all - Heyerdahl - who is proven to be a visionary hero. It was interesting to me to see this hero of my childhood seen in another - and darker - light. He was a genius and more than a little insane. What a revelation to me after all these years!!! I spoke to the Directors of 'Kon Tiki' Joachim Roenning and Espen Sandberg in La recently where we met after being initially introduced at the Palm Springs International Film Festival. They are Oslo residents and lifelong friends who started making films when they were 10 years old. They began in the '80's to make music videos. From the beginning they were influenced by Us films which they always liked. In the early 90's when out of film school they made TV commercials. They now own Motion Blur which is the biggest Norwegian production house for commercials. In 2008 they made their first Directed feature, 'Max Manus' which was a WW2 feature. It had a Us$10 million budget and sold 5 million theater tickets and 1.2 million bought non theatrical access for a gross of Us$20 million. Big success. Kon Tiki has had the 2nd biggest Norwegian theatrical run at $14.2 million box office receipts. Internationally The Weinstein Company has bought North America and the UK all rights. Hanway the excellent UK International Sales Company is handling 50 territories for sales. Today the Directors are stretching their legs a bit and touring the states with their families. They are considering work in the Us and consider themselves 'entrepreneurs'. They are currently taking meetings and reviewing new projects. I wish them well, they are very talented and told this tough story with great flair and honesty. The following text I have edited down from Wikipedia but nerds like me who want more can look him Heyerdahl up there. This below is Not about the film but reflects the background story a bit, history and fuss that Heyerdahl evoked, a really remarkable man. from Wikipedia - Thor Heyerdahl (October 6, 1914, Larvik, Norway – April 18, 2002, Colla Micheri, Italy) was a Norwegian ethnographer and adventurer with a background in zoology and geography. He became notable for his Kon-Tiki expedition, in which he sailed 8,000 km (5,000 mi) across the Pacific Ocean in a self-built raft from South America to the Tuamotu Islands in 1947. The expedition was designed to demonstrate that ancient people could have made long sea voyages, creating contacts between apparently separate cultures. This was linked to a diffusionist model of cultural development. Heyerdahl was born in Larvik, the son of master brewer Thor Heyerdahl and his wife Alison Lyng. As a young child, Heyerdahl showed a strong interest in zoology. He created a small museum in his childhood home, with a Vipera berus as the main attraction. He studied zoology and geography at the University of Oslo. At the same time, he privately studied Polynesian culture and history, consulting what was then the world's largest private collection of books and papers on Polynesia, owned by Bjarne Kropelien, a wealthy wine merchant in Oslo. This collection was later purchased by the University of Oslo Library from Kropelien's heirs and was attached to the Kon-Tiki Museum research department. After seven terms and consultations with experts in Berlin, a project was developed and sponsored by Heyerdahl's zoology professors, Kristine Bonnevie and Hjalmar Broch. He was to visit some isolated Pacific island groups and study how the local animals had found their way there. In the Kon-Tiki expedition, Heyerdahl and five fellow adventurers went to Peru, they constructed a pae-pae raft from balsa wood and other native materials, a raft that they called the Kon-Tiki. The Kon-Tiki expedition was inspired by old reports and drawings made by the Spanish Conquistadors of Inca rafts, and by native legends and archaeological evidence suggesting contact between South America and Polynesia. After a 101-day, 4,300 nautical mile (4,948 miles or 7,964 km)[6] journey across the Pacific Ocean, Kon-Tiki smashed into the reef at Raroia in the Tuamotu Islands on August 7, 1947. Heyerdahl, who had nearly drowned at least twice in childhood, did not take easily to water, and said later that there were times in each of his raft voyages when he feared for his life. Kon-Tiki demonstrated that it was possible for a primitive raft to sail the Pacific with relative ease and safety, especially to the west (with the wind). The raft proved to be highly maneuverable, and fish congregated between the nine balsa logs in such numbers that ancient sailors could have possibly relied on fish for hydration in the absence of other sources of fresh water. Inspired by Kon-Tiki, other rafts have repeated the voyage. Heyerdahl's book about the expedition, The Kon-Tiki Expedition: By Raft Across the South Seas, has been translated into over 67 languages. The documentary film of the expedition, itself entitled Kon-Tiki, won an Academy Award in 1951. Anthropologists continue to believe, based on linguistic, physical, and genetic evidence, that Polynesia was settled from west to east, migration having begun from the Asian mainland. There are controversial indications, though, of some sort of South American/Polynesian contact, most notably in the fact that the South American sweet potato is served as a dietary staple throughout much of Polynesia. Blood samples taken in 1971 and 2008 from Easter Islanders without any European or other external descent were analysed in a 2011 study, which concluded that the evidence supported some aspects of Heyerdahl's hypothesis. Heyerdahl attempted to counter the linguistic argument with the analogy that, guessing the origin of African-Americans, he would prefer to believe that they came from Africa, judging from their skin colour, and not from England, judging from their speech. Heyerdahl claimed that in Incan legend there was a sun-god named Con-Tici Viracocha who was the supreme head of the mythical fair-skinned people in Peru. The original name for Viracocha was Kon-Tiki or Illa-Tiki, which means Sun-Tiki or Fire-Tiki. Kon-Tiki was high priest and sun-king of these legendary "white men" who left enormous ruins on the shores of Lake Titicaca. The legend continues with the mysterious bearded white men being attacked by a chief named Cari who came from the Coquimbo Valley. They had a battle on an island in Lake Titicaca, and the fair race was massacred. However, Kon-Tiki and his closest companions managed to escape and later arrived on the Pacific coast. The legend ends with Kon-Tiki and his companions disappearing westward out to sea. When the Spaniards came to Peru, Heyerdahl asserted, the Incas told them that the colossal monuments that stood deserted about the landscape were erected by a race of white gods who had lived there before the Incas themselves became rulers. The Incas described these "white gods" as wise, peaceful instructors who had originally come from the north in the "morning of time" and taught the Incas' primitive forefathers architecture as well as manners and customs. They were unlike other Native Americans in that they had "white skins and long beards" and were taller than the Incas. The Incas said that the "white gods" had then left as suddenly as they had come and fled westward across the Pacific. After they had left, the Incas themselves took over power in the country. Heyerdahl said that when the Europeans first came to the Pacific islands, they were astonished that they found some of the natives to have relatively light skins and beards. There were whole families that had pale skin, hair varying in color from reddish to blonde. In contrast, most of the Polynesians had golden-brown skin, raven-black hair, and rather flat noses. Heyerdahl claimed that when Jakob Roggeveen first discovered Easter Island in 1722, he supposedly noticed that many of the natives were white-skinned. Heyerdahl claimed that these people could count their ancestors who were "white-skinned" right back to the time of Tiki and Hotu Matua, when they first came sailing across the sea "from a mountainous land in the east which was scorched by the sun." The ethnographic evidence for these claims is outlined in Heyerdahl's book Aku Aku: The Secret of Easter Island. Heyerdahl proposed that Tiki's neolithic people colonized the then-uninhabited Polynesian islands as far north as Hawaii, as far south as New Zealand, as far east as Easter Island, and as far west as Samoa and Tonga around 500 Ad. They supposedly sailed from Peru to the Polynesian islands on pae-paes—large rafts built from balsa logs, complete with sails and each with a small cottage. They built enormous stone statues carved in the image of human beings on Pitcairn, the Marquesas, and Easter Island that resembled those in Peru. They also built huge pyramids on Tahiti and Samoa with steps like those in Peru. But all over Polynesia, Heyerdahl found indications that Tiki's peaceable race had not been able to hold the islands alone for long. He found evidence that suggested that seagoing war canoes as large as Viking ships and lashed together two and two had brought Stone Age Northwest American Indians to Polynesia around 1100 Ad, and they mingled with Tiki's people. The oral history of the people of Easter Island, at least as it was documented by Heyerdahl, is completely consistent with this theory, as is the archaeological record he examined (Heyerdahl 1958). In particular, Heyerdahl obtained a radiocarbon date of 400 Ad for a charcoal fire located in the pit that was held by the people of Easter Island to have been used as an "oven" by the "Long Ears," which Heyerdahl's Rapa Nui sources, reciting oral tradition, identified as a white race which had ruled the island in the past (Heyerdahl 1958). Heyerdahl further argued in his book American Indians in the Pacific that the current inhabitants of Polynesia migrated from an Asian source, but via an alternate route. He proposes that Polynesians traveled with the wind along the North Pacific current. These migrants then arrived in British Columbia. Heyerdahl called contemporary tribes of British Columbia, such as the Tlingit and Haida, descendants of these migrants. Heyerdahl claimed that cultural and physical similarities existed between these British Columbian tribes, Polynesians, and the Old World source. Heyerdahl's claims aside, however, there is no evidence that the Tlingit, Haida or other British Columbian tribes have an affinity with Polynesians. Heyerdahl's theory of Polynesian origins never gained acceptance among anthropologists. Physical and cultural evidence had long suggested that Polynesia was settled from west to east, migration having begun from the Asian mainland, not South America. In the late 1990s, genetic testing found that the mitochondrial DNA of the Polynesians is more similar to people from southeast Asia than to people from South America, showing that their ancestors most likely came from Asia.[12] Easter Islanders are of Polynesian descent. Anthropologist Robert Carl Suggs included a chapter titled "The Kon-Tiki Myth" in his book on Polynesia, concluding that "The Kon-Tiki theory is about as plausible as the tales of Atlantis, Mu, and 'Children of the Sun.' Like most such theories it makes exciting light reading, but as an example of scientific method it fares quite poorly." Anthropologist and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Wade Davis also criticised Heyerdahl's theory in his book The Wayfinders, which explores the history of Polynesia. Davis says that Heyerdahl "ignored the overwhelming body of linguistic, ethnographic, and ethnobotanical evidence, augmented today by genetic and archaeological data, indicating that he was patently wrong."
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

E.T. Stars - Where Are They Now?

E.T. Stars - Where Are They Now?
There are many things that make Steven Spielberg's 'E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial' -- thirty years old this year -- a magical masterpiece: a sensitive script, fantastic special effects (it's often easy to forget the title star is a mechanical puppet), John Williams' uplifting score. But one of the most over-looked aspects is the cast.

Eschewing big name stars and established child actors, Spielberg discovered a raft of talent, young and old, that do much to make 'E.T.' such an emotional experience. Here are their 'E.T.' stories and what happened next....

E.T. is 30 years old - hard to believe, but true

Henry Thomas (Elliott Taylor)

That was then: "I used to think 'If I mess this up, what's going to happen?'" recalls Henry Thomas about his days as the lead in 'E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial'. "'Are they going fire me? I'm nine years old.
See full article at Huffington Post »
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