IMDb > Naqoyqatsi (2002)
Naqoyqatsi
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Naqoyqatsi (2002) More at IMDbPro »

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Naqoyqatsi -- Lionsgate Home Entertainment and Oscar-winning filmmaker Steven Soderbergh (Best Director, TRAFFIC, 2000) present NAQOYQATSI (Life As War), from filmmaker Godfrey Reggio, in collaboration with composer Phillip Glass, whose original score features renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma.
Naqoyqatsi -- HV
Naqoyqatsi -- HV CT #1
Naqoyqatsi -- A visual montage portrait of our contemporary world dominated by gobalized technology and violence.

Overview

User Rating:
6.7/10   3,850 votes »
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Director:
Writer:
Godfrey Reggio (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Naqoyqatsi on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
21 January 2003 (Czech Republic) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Test-drive the future See more »
Plot:
A visual montage portrait of our contemporary world dominated by globalized technology and violence. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
NewsDesk:
(28 articles)
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User Reviews:
Naqoyqatsi a visual mess and a disappointing closure to trilogy. See more (63 total) »

Cast

 

Belladonna ... Herself

Marlon Brando ... Himself (archive footage)

Elton John ... Himself (archive footage)

Julia Louis-Dreyfus ... Herself (archive footage)

Madonna ... Herself (archive footage)

Bhagwan Mirchandani ... Business Man

Jack Shamblin ... Atomic Adam

Steven Soderbergh ... Man reflected in digital screens (3rd segment)
Troy Aikman ... Himself (at Super Bowl XXX) (archive footage) (uncredited)

The Beatles ... Themselves (archive footage) (uncredited)

Osama bin Laden ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)

Fidel Castro ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)
Warren Christopher ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)

Bill Clinton ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)

The Dalai Lama ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)

Thomas A. Edison ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)

Albert Einstein ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)

Adolf Hitler ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)
Nikita Khrushchev ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)

Martin Luther King ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)

Henry Kissinger ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)

V.I. Lenin ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)

Greg Louganis ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)
Jeff Maksym ... Himself (uncredited)
Zedong Mao ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)

Pope John Paul II ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)

Ronald Reagan ... Himself - Assassination Attempt (archive footage) (uncredited)
Jimmy Swaggart ... Himself (archive footage) (uncredited)

Directed by
Godfrey Reggio 
 
Writing credits
Godfrey Reggio (written by)

Produced by
Joe Beirne .... producer
Lauren Feeney .... assistant producer
Steve Goldin .... associate producer
Mel Lawrence .... co-producer
Federico Negri .... line producer
Godfrey Reggio .... producer
Steven Soderbergh .... executive producer
Lawrence Taub .... producer
 
Original Music by
Philip Glass 
 
Cinematography by
Russell Lee Fine 
 
Film Editing by
Jon Kane 
 
Makeup Department
Sanja Milic .... makeup department head
 
Production Management
Michele Barrett .... production manager: Detroit
Susan Lazarus .... post-production supervisor
Sophia Lin .... production manager: New York City
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Jon Kane .... second unit director
 
Art Department
Jon Kane .... visual designer
 
Sound Department
Steve Boeddeker .... sound designer
Martin Czembor .... sound re-recording mixer
Matthew Griffin .... sound apprentice (as Matt Griffin)
Noah Katz .... assistant sound designer
Avi Laniado .... engineering support
Mario McNulty .... assistant sound engineer
Nathaniel Reichman .... sound services
Steve F.B. Smith .... stereo sound consultant: Dolby
 
Visual Effects by
Manuel Gaulot .... visual effects and image reanimation
Lucien Harriot .... digital effects artist
Cameron Hickey .... original CGI animator
Zachary Medow .... original CGI animator (as Zachary David Medow)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
John Bailey .... camera operator: guest camera
Christopher Bottoms .... assistant camera
John Clemens .... first assistant camera: New York City
Michael J. Conner .... chief electrician: Detroit
Jesse Cory .... grip
Timothy Housel .... additional camera operator
Rob Salviotti .... Steadicam assistant
 
Editorial Department
David Abelson .... assistant film editor
Don Ciana .... color timer
Joe Gawler .... digital intermediate colorist
Karla P. Henwood .... conforming editor
Karla P. Henwood .... first assistant editor
Bill Morrison .... additional editor
Stan Sztaba .... negative cutter
Harold Lee Yen .... apprentice editor
 
Music Department
Albert de Ruiter .... musician: bass vocalist
Jack Kripl .... musician: flute
Yo-Yo Ma .... musician: cello solos
Kurt Munkacsi .... music producer
Nathaniel Reichman .... assistant music studio director
Michael Riesman .... conductor
John Moses .... musician: clarinetist (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Jeffrey A. Brown .... assistant production coordinator: New York City
Ty Burr .... project realization
Boris Cifuentes .... production assistant
Ray Hemenez .... image research director
Miroslav Janek .... continuity
Ekkehart Malotki .... consultant: Hopi language
Sam Taub .... production assistant
Christian Zak .... technical director
 
Thanks
George Lucas .... continuing thanks
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsSpecial EffectsOther Companies
  • Skywalker Sound  Sound editorial services provided by (as SKYWALKER SOUND, a division of Lucas Digital Ltd. Marin County, California)
  • Sound One Corporation  Sound Mixed at (as SOUND ONE Corp., New York)

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Naqoyqatsi: Life as War" - USA (poster title)
See more »
MPAA:
Rated PG for violent and disturbing images, and for brief nudity
Runtime:
89 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.78 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Company:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The film's title has three meanings according to the closing credits. They are (1) a life of killing each other (2) war as a way of life and (3) civilized violence (interpretation).See more »
Movie Connections:
Edited from Perfect Dark (2000) (VG)See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
35 out of 43 people found the following review useful.
Naqoyqatsi a visual mess and a disappointing closure to trilogy., 12 February 2003
Author: Darrell Holtz (akashicrecordings) from Guelph, Ontario

The lights went down in the movie theater, and I sank down in my seat anxious to give my complete and undivided attention over to the visual hypnotist, who twice previous has put me under and filled me with moving, profound visuals and awe-inspiring landscapes. My expectations were high, and they had every right to be, considering past trips our director has taken me on before. Philip Glass's music began - instantly recognizable. Coupled with the first few visuals - classic Reggio. Everything felt familiar, and I thought, once more here I am in for a real visual ride. Something novel, something adventurous, an evolution and a step up from where we had last left the "qatsi" series.

Yes, I knew beforehand going in to the film the overall colour and tone that a film on "war as a way of life" would and should have. Lots of greys and other dreary hues. Indeed, show me one frame in this 90-minute film with some colour in it. Yet, it is not the bleakness of the film's visual shade that had me consistently throughout the film slipping in and out of interest. My problem was with the irrelevancy of numerous images to the theme of what the translation of "Naqoyqatsi" is all about.

Rarely are we presented with any images pertaining to anything remotely concerned with warfare and the causes and effects of such. Brief, hazy shots near the end of the film arrive far too late for the viewer to want to consider and reflect upon these. Up till then, we are bombarded with an overwhelming array of visual distractions that either work to divert or numb our senses to the point of yawning indifference - that when the film finally arrives at its point, its promoted subject, that of "war as a way of life," the string of shots showing mushroom clouds, marching troops, and human suffering strangely seem tacked on as if they do not appear logically from their preceding images.

And herein lies the one major flaw of this film. There is no weaving thread connecting the shots smoothly together. It plays like a confusing collage of quickly cut montages scrambled up like a jigsaw puzzle that we the viewer are required to try and make sense of. Whereas "Koyaanisqatsi" consisted of recognizable logic from one image to the next, an arc if you will, where we are able to distinguish a beginning with an end (the cause and the effect), here we can define no order in the direction from image-to-image, we search for meaning in the many diversions and abstractions that are presented to us, and neither have the time nor the patience to find any - for swiftly the images roll by, a spate of such that overwhelms our minds to the point where often we find ourselves mentally tiring out, unable to keep up with the alarming pace of interconnecting/overlapping grainy and muddled visuals. (Some shots are so dark and cloudy I oftentimes found myself not even knowing what I was looking at.) Because the film is so neurotic in its imagery and so fuzzy to look at periodically throughout, we end up losing interest and caring about the film around the first 30 minutes in, that by the time Reggio delivers his anticipated visual payoffs, yes our attention is whisked back in, but are we at this point able to FEEL anything for what we are seeing?

The first two films of this trilogy were masterpieces, the two separate and unique from each other in both music and atmosphere, with a director whose passion for his project truly manifested itself on screen in the many natural wonders and exotic settings he captured. Here, Reggio takes the easy way out, in ironically using a slew of computer-generated visual effects to achieve a handful of dazzling creations (not to be missed) that previously he physically would have sought out Creation itself for. Perhaps he's getting tired, for I felt his heart just wasn't in this film like it was the previous two chapters. Perhaps this installment was brought about into existence only out of a sense of duty - an obligation in completing a pre-ordained trilogy.

In "Powaqqatsi" he let his camera pause and study - scenery, faces, human actions - which allowed us the time to gaze, ponder and reflect. We observed and we contemplated. There is no opportunity for that here. The countless shots (450 of them) rush along and bury our concentration under its suffocating heap.

This commentary compared to the first two, falls surprisingly flat. All the abstractions and digital code become tedious and tiresome after a while. The whole point of such flashy trickery ought to be to stir the audience to feeling, not stultify them and make them indifferent to the images they see.

Like witnessing a dream where the images just do not logically connect and make sense, I was only pleased to awaken from this film with an anxious awaiting to do so all throughout the confusion. To stand up, stretch, and step back into a universe where the 6 pm news possesses more of the "Naqoyqatsi" theme than this film does. The visuals here do not correlate with each other; there's murkiness, there's quirky doctoring of images, there's distortion. It all comes down to chaos, and perhaps this is to be taken as a metaphor in defining our times. In which case, in rating this film I could well in fact be rating the world we live in. Perhaps then, Reggio's final installment achieves its aim afterall - in the aggressive use of a technologically-armed visual attack that we are only too anxious to want to question in the end.

Koyaanisqatsi Rating Out Of Ten : 10.

Powaqqatisi Rating Out Of Ten : 9.

Naqoyqatsi Rating Out Of Ten : 5.

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Awful movie. picasso2
Incredible and advanced--reviewers missed the point entirely strawberryfields747
Somewhat disappointing mikeyb-2
Always watch it in 4:3 londomollari
Does it really suck? B-Bere
9/11 ? mib1999ad
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