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Angela's Ashes (1999)

R | | Drama | 21 January 2000 (USA)
Based on the best selling autobiography by Irish expat Frank McCourt, Angela's Ashes follows the experiences of young Frankie and his family as they try against all odds to escape the ... See full summary »

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Writers:

(book), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »

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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 5 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Joe Breen ...
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Ronnie Masterson ...
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Liam Carney ...
Eanna MacLiam ...
Andrew Bennett ...
Narrator (voice)
Shane Murray-Corcoran ...
Young Malachy (as Shane Murray Corcoran)
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Middle Malachy
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Older Malachy
Aaron Geraghty ...
New Born Michael
Sean Carney Daly ...
Baby Michael
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Storyline

Based on the best selling autobiography by Irish expat Frank McCourt, Angela's Ashes follows the experiences of young Frankie and his family as they try against all odds to escape the poverty endemic in the slums of pre-war Limerick. The film opens with the family in Brooklyn, but following the death of one of Frankie's siblings, they return home, only to find the situation there even worse. Prejudice against Frankie's Northern Irish father makes his search for employment in the Republic difficult despite his having fought for the IRA, and when he does find money, he spends the money on drink. Written by KB-26

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

irish | limerick | ira | drink | prejudice | See All (233) »

Taglines:

The Hopes of a Mother. The Dreams of a Father. The Fate of a Child.

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sexual content and some language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

21 January 2000 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Las cenizas de Ángela  »

Box Office

Budget:

$50,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$54,628 (USA) (26 December 1999)

Gross:

$13,038,660 (USA) (21 May 2000)
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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Alan Parker: The doctor who treats Frank McCourt when he is in the hospital with typhoid. See more »

Goofs

During the lunar eclipse, the moon shown is actually a mirror image of the moon. In a later scene, showing clouds beginning to cover the moon, the moon is shown normally. See more »

Quotes

Theresa: Lord, you might be scrawny, but that's a fine boyo you have there.
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Connections

Spoofed in Mirrorball (2000) See more »

Soundtracks

Pennies from Heaven
Written by Johnny Burke (as J. Burke) and Arthur Johnston (as A. Johnson)
Performed by Billie Holiday
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

I suggest you read the book... and keep an open mind.
7 March 2004 | by (New York) – See all my reviews

I've read both Angela's Ashes, and 'Tis (the sequal also by McCourt), and I think that really helped get a good perspective of what's going on. A lot happens that we aren't shown in the movie, which makes sense considering a word for word rendition of the text would be far too long.

But reading the book provides you with a little more background- more insight as to WHY the family is in the situation it is (the mother was "knocked up" and the two were forced into marriage and family life that probably NEITHER were ready for), and especially the impact of the death of the little baby girl had- most notable in the father.

All in all, it was a great film... seriously. It's the memories a poor Irish childhood- but the best part is that much of it is told through the eyes of a 'child' (even if its in retrospect). The reason that it is unique, I think, is that if the viewer is open enough, they can get beneath the obvious misery that we're pelted with and really see the innocence of a child through out the story.

I get really irritated with those that brush it off as "been there, done that", or "Woe is me, I was a poor Irish child." I think that shows ignorance and disgusting apathy- go watch a movie where stuff explodes to keep your feeble mind occupied, because you obviously are too shallow to understand what you're seeing. Imagine yourself as that child- in a nation full of families stuck in the same rut. This isn't some Hollywood drama concocted... this is(was) someone's LIFE. And the movie sticks very much to the book- I remembered many of the exact lines word for word from the text. Also... a few people have complained about the 'incomplete' ending. That's pretty much exactly where the book ends- read (horror of HORRORS!) the sequal, 'Tis, to find out the rest.

Either way- very touching film. Definitely dark and deep, and I recommend it to anyone who has an open mind.


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