IMDb > "Popeye the Sailor" (1960)

"Popeye the Sailor" (1960) More at IMDbPro »TV series 1960-2014


Overview

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Seasons:
1 | 2 | unknown
Release Date:
1960 (USA) See more »
NewsDesk:
(12 articles)
"Popeye Protek the Weakerist"
 (From SneakPeek. 5 March 2014, 7:03 PM, PST)

Is ‘The Hobbit’ Better Told in 11 Minutes or 11 Hours?
 (From FilmSchoolRejects. 15 December 2013, 1:00 PM, PST)

Family Guy: 10 Greatest Cutaway Gags
 (From Obsessed with Film. 23 October 2013, 8:24 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
Popeye Comes To Television See more (8 total) »

Cast

 (Series Cast [3])
Jack Mercer ... Popeye / ... (188 episodes, 1960-1961)

Mae Questel ... Olive Oyl / ... (156 episodes, 1960-1961)
Jackson Beck ... Brutus / ... (126 episodes, 1960-1961)

Series Directed by
Jack Kinney (101 episodes, 1960)
Seymour Kneitel (63 episodes, 1960-1961)
Gene Deitch (28 episodes, 1960-1961)
Paul Fennell (18 episodes, 1960)
Bob Bemiller (5 episodes, 1960)
Tom McDonald (5 episodes, 1960)
 
Series Writing credits
Ed Nofziger (27 episodes, 1960)
Seymour Kneitel (20 episodes, 1960-1961)
Jack Mercer (19 episodes, 1960-1961)
Carl Meyer (19 episodes, 1960-1961)
Charles Shows (18 episodes, 1960)
Jack Kinney (15 episodes, 1960)
Isadore Klein (10 episodes, 1960-1961)
Raymond Jacobs (8 episodes, 1960)
Walter Schmidt (8 episodes, 1960)
Joseph Gottlieb (8 episodes, 1961)
Joe Grant (7 episodes, 1960)
Edwin Rehberg (5 episodes, 1960)
Ralph Wright (5 episodes, 1960)
Carole Beers (3 episodes, 1960)
Cal Howard (3 episodes, 1960)
Noel Tucker (3 episodes, 1960)
Howard A. Schneider (2 episodes, 1960-1961)
Osmond Evans (2 episodes, 1960)
Ken Hultgren (2 episodes, 1960)
Jack Miller (2 episodes, 1960)
Milt Schaffer (2 episodes, 1960)
Irving Dressler (2 episodes, 1961)

Series Produced by
Al Brodax .... executive producer (220 episodes, 1960-1961)
Jack Kinney .... producer (101 episodes, 1960)
William L. Snyder .... producer (28 episodes, 1960-1961)
Larry Harmon .... producer (18 episodes, 1960)
Gerald Ray .... producer (10 episodes, 1960)
John Halas .... producer (7 episodes, 1960-1961)
 
Series Original Music by
Ken Lowman (100 episodes, 1960)
Winston Sharples (64 episodes, 1960-1961)
Gordon Zahler (18 episodes, 1960)
 
Series Film Editing by
Joe Siracusa (45 episodes, 1960)
Roger Donley (26 episodes, 1960)
Cliff Millsap (22 episodes, 1960)
Dan Milner (18 episodes, 1960)
Norman Vizents (10 episodes, 1960)
 
Series Art Department
Anton Loeb .... scenic artist (54 episodes, 1960-1961)
Robert Owen .... scenic artist (7 episodes, 1960-1961)
 
Series Sound Department
Marne Fallis .... sound engineer (49 episodes, 1960)
 
Series Camera and Electrical Department
Jack Eckes .... camera operator (59 episodes, 1960)
Jack Buehre .... camera operator (16 episodes, 1960)
Bill Kotler .... camera operator (11 episodes, 1960)
Dick Blundell .... camera operator (3 episodes, 1960)
 
Series Animation Department
Vera McKinney .... ink and paint artist (93 episodes, 1960)
Jules Engel .... background artist / color artist (62 episodes, 1960)
Raymond Jacobs .... layout artist / background artist (36 episodes, 1960)
Rosemary O'Connor .... background artist (35 episodes, 1960)
Ervin L. Kaplan .... background artist (32 episodes, 1960)
Boris Gorelick .... background artist (31 episodes, 1960)
Jane Philippi .... checking (28 episodes, 1960)
Isadore Klein .... animator (25 episodes, 1960-1961)
Morey Reden .... animator (23 episodes, 1960-1961)
Irving Dressler .... animator (21 episodes, 1960-1961)
Wm. B. Pattengill .... animator (20 episodes, 1960-1961)
Gerald Nevius .... layout artist (19 episodes, 1960)
Evelyn Sherwood .... checking / animation checker (19 episodes, 1960)
Tom Baron .... animator (18 episodes, 1960)
Jean Blanchard .... animator (18 episodes, 1960)
Cal Dalton .... animator (18 episodes, 1960)
C.L. Hartman .... animator (18 episodes, 1960)
Zygamond Jablecki .... layout artist (18 episodes, 1960)
Frank Onaitis .... animator (18 episodes, 1960)
George Rowley .... animator (18 episodes, 1960)
Lou Scheimer .... artist (18 episodes, 1960)
Hal Sutherland .... animator (18 episodes, 1960)
Ken Hultgren .... animation director / layout artist (17 episodes, 1960)
Volus Jones .... animation director / animator (17 episodes, 1960)
Dick Hall .... animator (16 episodes, 1960-1961)
Martin Taras .... animator (16 episodes, 1960-1961)
Noel Tucker .... layout artist / background artist (16 episodes, 1960)
Gerry Dvorak .... animator (15 episodes, 1960-1961)
Harvey Toombs .... animation director / animator (15 episodes, 1960)
Ed Friedman .... animation director (14 episodes, 1960)
Moley McColley .... checking (14 episodes, 1960)
Jack Ehret .... animator (13 episodes, 1960-1961)
Jim Logan .... animator (13 episodes, 1960-1961)
Rudy Larriva .... animation director (13 episodes, 1960)
Hugh Fraser .... animation director (12 episodes, 1960)
William Henning .... animator (11 episodes, 1960-1961)
Buf Nerbovig .... checking (11 episodes, 1960)
Edwin Rehberg .... animation director / layout artist (11 episodes, 1960)
George Germanetti .... animator (11 episodes, 1961)
Sam Stimson .... animator (10 episodes, 1960-1961)
Izzy Ellis .... animator (10 episodes, 1960)
John Garling .... animator (10 episodes, 1960)
Bill Higgins .... animator (10 episodes, 1960)
Sam Kai .... animator (10 episodes, 1960)
Henry Lee .... layout artist (10 episodes, 1960)
Casey Onaitis .... animator (10 episodes, 1960)
Bud Partch .... animator (10 episodes, 1960)
Barney Posner .... animator (10 episodes, 1960)
Dave Weidman .... background artist (10 episodes, 1960)
Ray Young .... animator (10 episodes, 1960)
Al Pross .... animator (9 episodes, 1960-1961)
Larry Silverman .... animator (8 episodes, 1960-1961)
Robert Givens .... layout artist (8 episodes, 1960)
Tony Guy .... animation director (7 episodes, 1960-1961)
Dante Barbetta .... animator (6 episodes, 1960-1961)
Nick Tafuri .... animator (6 episodes, 1960-1961)
Christine Decker .... checking (6 episodes, 1960)
Vern Jorgensen .... layout artist / background artist (5 episodes, 1960)
Ruth Tompson .... checking (5 episodes, 1960)
Bruce Bushman .... layout artist (4 episodes, 1960)
Grace McCurdy .... checking (4 episodes, 1960)
Peggy Morrow .... background artist (4 episodes, 1960)
Paul Marron .... checking (3 episodes, 1960)
Conne Morgan .... background artist (3 episodes, 1960)
John Gentilella .... animator (3 episodes, 1961)
Eric Cleworth .... animation director / animator (2 episodes, 1960)
Osmond Evans .... animation director (2 episodes, 1960)
Bill Keil .... animation director / animator (2 episodes, 1960)
Bob McIntosh .... background artist (2 episodes, 1960)
Alan Zaslove .... animation director (2 episodes, 1960)
 

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Additional Details

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Runtime:
Argentina:30 min | USA:30 min
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10 out of 11 people found the following review useful.
Popeye Comes To Television, 21 July 2003
Author: Michael Daly (fanstp43@aol.com) from United States

After some 24 years in theatrical shorts, the longest tenure of any running cartoon character to that time, Popeye was curiously stricken from Paramount Pictures' cartoon cast. However, King Features, owner of the character, revived the spinach-eating sailor man and friends for a series of televisions shorts, totaling some 220 cartoons farmed out to Paramount Pictures, Larry Harmon/UPA, Jack Kinney Studios, William Snyder & Gene Deitch, and Total Television.

These television cartoons "updated" Popeye's world by mixing 1960-topical suburban settings with use of characters, such as the Sea Hag and King Blozo, who came from the original E.C. Segar comics but were never used in Popeye's theatrical shorts; also brought in for several shorts were the Goons, hulking mute characters first seen in the 1930s, and Eugene The Jeep, another revival from the 1930s comic strip. Character designs were also changed to reflect the "back to the future" quality of the shorts, particularly in the design of Olive Oyl, while some new characters were introduced, notably Olive's troublesome niece Diesel Oyl, a female counterpart to Popeye's four nephews (curiously not revived from the 1940s-50s cartoons).

The different studios used made for an uneven quality to the cartoons. Some of the best animation came from the Snyder-Deitch shorts, especially those which utilized Britain's famous Halas & Batchelor animation studios, while the best character gags often came from the Harmon/UPA shorts, which sometimes used background music first used for Mr. Magoo cartoons.

Paramount and Kinney released the highest number of cartoons, and the differences in style and intangibles were striking. The Kinney cartoons strove to be funny, and often were, but suffered from inconsistent character designs (Ken Hultgren was the animator most frequently used and his character designs were periodically the sloppiest of the series) as well as some of the weakest soundtracks of the series, re-using the sound FX library used for "Rocky & Bullwinkle."

The Paramount shorts, meanwhile, had by far the best production values of all, in character designs, backgrounds, sound FX, and in the use of Winston Sharples' background scores; some of the animation was also quite good, even in the budget-crunched era of that time.

Given the enormity of quantity and the differing studios involved, the quality of stories tended to differ, but overall the scripts were engaging and sometimes genuinely brilliant, such as the Paramount short "It Only Hurts When They Laughs," a hilarious takeoff on Popeye and Brutus' long-running feud over Olive. The Paramount shorts tended to be the most melodramatic of the show and worked very well as such; particularly effective here was the Paramount short's treatment of Olive, who is by no means the damsel-in-distress so often portrayed in the past. Here Olive gets substantialy to flex her own muscle, such as in "A Poil For Olive Oyl," when she spots the Sea Hag sending swordfish in pursuit of Popeye at the ocean floor and downs a can of spinach for the strength to finish off Haggie. Popeye for his part had shown a mild chauvinism in 1940s and '50s cartoons (such as the hilarious 1956 short "Car-razy Drivers") but here recognizes his love's own strength and actually encourages it, in "Hamburgers A-weigh" when, after using spinach to acquire Superman-esquire power (a favorite cliché of the Popeye series from the late 1930s onward), feeds a large swig to Olive to give her the same power, so she can fight off the Sea Hag - Popeye being too much of the gentleman to strike a woman, even if it is the Sea Hag.

The 1960s shorts build on the strengths of the 1940s and '50s shorts and remain engaging cartoons in the long-running series.

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