6.2/10
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400 user 136 critic

Stigmata (1999)

When a young woman becomes afflicted by stigmata, a priest is sent to investigate her case, which may have severe ramifications for his faith and for the Catholic Church itself.

Director:

Writers:

(story), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
6 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Father Durning
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Marion Petrocelli (as Rade Sherbedgia)
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Father Dario
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Father Gianni Delmonico
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Steven
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Doctor
Tom Hodges ...
ER Nurse
Lydia Hazan ...
Attending Nurse
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Dr. Eckworth (as Duke Moosekian)
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Storyline

A priest from the Vatican is sent to Sao Paulo, Brazil to investigate the appearance of the face of the Virgin Mary on the side of a building. While there he hears of a statue of the Virgin Mary bleeding tears in a small town outside of the city. Meanwhile, a young woman in the U.S. begins to show signs of stigmata, the wounds of Christ. The priest from the Vatican links up with her and cares for her as she is increasingly afflicted by the stigmata. Her ranting and raving finally begins to make sense to the priest who starts to question what his religion has stood for for the last 1900 years. Written by Jeff Mellinger <jmell@uclink4.berkeley.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

How's your faith these days? See more »

Genres:

Horror

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for intense violent sequences, language and some sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Release Date:

10 September 1999 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Toby's Story  »

Box Office

Budget:

$29,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$18,309,666 (USA) (10 September 1999)

Gross:

$50,041,732 (USA) (18 February 2000)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

During the final scene in the garden, the statue in the background is of Saint Francis of Assisi, the first person to bear the marks of the Stigmata. See more »

Goofs

Early on when Kiernan first meets Frankie in a club, she run out back into an alley between multiple buildings and starts having a major attack, with wind, pigeons, and sound effects. Clearly visible are boom mikes and cabling, particularly when the camera zooms out. See more »

Quotes

[Frankie is possessed by Father Alameida]
Frankie: Jesus said... the Kingdom of God is inside you, and all around you, not in mansions of wood and stone. Split a piece of wood... and I am there, lift a stone... and you will find me.
Father Andrew Kiernan: Brother Alameida, I call upon you to release this woman. Give her grace and let her not come into the ways of harm. For through Jesus Christ we have all been saved and let us not fear any ill. For Jesus is with us, and the Unity of the Holy Spirit will remain forever, and ...
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Connections

Referenced in End of Days (1999) See more »

Soundtracks

Gramarye
Written by Shelby Tate, August Cinjun Tate, Cedric Lemoyne, Jeffrey Cain Thompson and Gregory Slay
Performed by Remy Zero
Courtesy of DGC Records
Under license from Universal Music Special Markets
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

Better than you might think
26 January 2003 | by (Naugatuck CT USA) – See all my reviews

The "stigmata" is a Christian religious term that refers to the spontaneous appearance of wounds corresponding to the wounds on the Christ's body when he was crucified. This religious experience is most typically associated with deeply religious people and, I believe, is not one that is widely taken seriously. What makes this movie interesting is that it portrays the appearance of these wounds as a terrifying, extremely painful and ultimately humiliating experience. There's nothing conventionally religious in the experience portrayed here -- in fact, the victim is an athiest.

But, having bypassed the conventional, the movie is only partially successful in bringing the experience of the stigmata to the screen. The movie is a victim itself of a conventional portrayal of the evil bureaucratic Vatican desk jockeys suppressing "true" religion. And I have to admit that, as I was watching it, I found myself thinking, "Hmm, that sounds like the Gospel of Thomas," -- a famous Gnostic Gospel. Surprise.

But, overall, I'd recommend it as a decent movie and a departure from the generic, bland portrayal of Christian religious experience a la the Hallmark channel or "Touched by an Angel." It is a movie that can make you think about the nature of religious experience and its impact on an ordinary life.


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