"Our Mutual Friend"
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2014 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

2 items from 2014


Warren Clarke: a life in clips

12 November 2014 7:22 AM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The Dalziel and Pascoe, Clockwork Orange and Red Riding actor has died age 67. Here, we remember his finest on-screen moments

Warren Clarkes road to fame was long and hard-fought. Throughout the late 1960s and 70s, he eked out a living with a bit-part in a Playhouse here, or three separate walk-on Coronation Street characters there. In time, hed reach the level of recognition he deserved, but not before suffering through a glut of turgid period dramas like Our Mutual Friend, The Onedin Line and Jennie: Lady Randolph Churchill.

Clarkes first real brush with exposure came when he worked for Stanley Kubrick, playing the role of Alexs droog Dim in A Clockwork Orange. The role didnt ask a lot of him, relying as many subsequently would on his bulldog grunt of a face, but he nevertheless made his mark. The scene that always comes to mind first when I think of »

- Stuart Heritage

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How I persuaded Ralph Fiennes to play Charles Dickens

31 January 2014 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

As the film of her biography of The Invisible Woman comes to the big screen, Claire Tomalin reveals what it feels like to have your book adapted

Most writers can tell stories of how their books failed to be made into films. I had forgotten until I looked up old notes that I sold the film rights of my first book, a life of Mary Wollstonecraft: there was a lunch, a contract, a small sum of money, then nothing. Much the same happened with Mrs Jordan's Profession: a lot of interest and excitement, then it fizzled out (twice). And again with my life of Pepys. For years The Invisible Woman seemed destined to be yet another unmade film.

Biographies are, in their nature, far more difficult to make into films than novels, because novels come with plots constructed and dialogue written, whereas I don't invent dialogue for my subjects or plot their lives for them. »

- Claire Tomalin

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2014 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

2 items from 2014


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