La fille sur le pont (1999) - News Poster

News

Leconte launches smartphone film festival by Richard Mowe - 2018-02-05 11:38:08

Patrice Leconte at the launch of this year’s Mobile Film Festival in Paris, flanked by fellow jurors Amelle Chahbi and Ruben Alves Photo: Richard Mowe As a way of opening up the world of cinema to budding filmmakers who have talent, ingenuity and a smart phone the Mobile Film Festival has been nurturing opportunities for new generations for the past 13 years.

At a launch for the current edition in Paris, the festival’s founder Bruno Smadja said: “Smartphones are easily accessible by young filmmakers today, anywhere in the world, and with impressive filming quality. And the use of one same affordable technology by all participants gives the event its egalitarian and inclusive characteristic.”

The challenge set for all entrants is to tell a story in one minute. “This is what the audience likes and what convinces our jury in their selections: the motions these shorts manage to convey in only one minute.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Leconte launches smartphone film festival by Richard Mowe - 2018-02-05 11:38:08

Patrice Leconte at the launch of this year’s Mobile Film Festival in Paris, flanked by fellow jurors Amelle Chahbi and Ruben Alves Photo: Richard Mowe As a way of opening up the world of cinema to budding filmmakers who have talent, ingenuity and a smart phone the Mobile Film Festival has been nurturing opportunities for new generations for the past 13 years.

At a launch for the current edition in Paris, the festival’s founder Bruno Smadja said: “Smartphones are easily accessible by young filmmakers today, anywhere in the world, and with impressive filming quality. And the use of one same affordable technology by all participants gives the event its egalitarian and inclusive characteristic.”

The challenge set for all entrants is to tell a story in one minute. “This is what the audience likes and what convinces our jury in their selections: the motions these shorts manage to convey in only one minute.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

The 25 Best French Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Amélie’ to ‘Cache’

  • Indiewire
The 25 Best French Movies of the 21st Century, From ‘Amélie’ to ‘Cache’
Cinema was one of the truly international phenomenons of the last millennium, but France — more so than any other nation — has always been one of the medium’s most essential guiding lights. From the pioneer era of the Lumiere brothers, to the revolutionary New Wave that expanded our understanding of film’s potential, to the country’s recent defense of the theatrical experience, France has always pushed the movies forward while reminding us what we love about them in the first place. No country did more to help propel cinema into the 20th Century, and no country has done more to help sustain its integrity and its potential in the 21st.

From sultry thrillers to mind-blowing 3D experiments and one of the most heartbreakingly honest love stories ever told, these are the 25 best French films of the 21st Century.

Note: To qualify for our list, a film had to be
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Planetarium’ Review: Despite Strong Turns From Natalie Portman And Lily-Rose Depp, Rebecca Zlotowski’s Is A Star-Studded Bore

  • Indiewire
‘Planetarium’ Review: Despite Strong Turns From Natalie Portman And Lily-Rose Depp, Rebecca Zlotowski’s Is A Star-Studded Bore
Like an apparition that dissipates back into the ether before it can assume any meaningful shape, Rebecca Zlotowski’s “Planetarium” is a starry-eyed and somnambulant period adventure that captures the spirit of the movies at the expense of their soul. The film, which stars Natalie Portman and Lily-Rose Depp as vagabond sisters who land in Paris between the two great wars of the 20th century, begins with a compellingly morbid notion: Cinema isn’t dead, cinema is death itself. If only Zlotowski’s latest contribution to the medium ever found any life of its own.

A beautiful wisp of an idea that is seldom compelling and almost never coherent, “Planetarium” squanders an irresistibly alluring premise. Loosely inspired by the Fox sisters and other formative figures in the field of Spiritualism, the film clings to Laura (Portman) and Kate (Depp) Barlow as tightly as the siblings cling to each other. Orphaned
See full article at Indiewire »

The 20 Best Black-and-White Movies of the Last 20 Years

  • Indiewire
The 20 Best Black-and-White Movies of the Last 20 Years
Once the default mode, black and white has now become a bold statement of artistic intention. What that intention is, however, seems to be a little bit different for all of the recent films that have made the most of it. Often, monochrome is used as a pipeline to the past — in “Good Night, and Good Luck,” a lack of color not only speaks to how history remembers Edward R. Murrow, it also conjures the imagery of his television news broadcasts. Michael Haneke’s “The White Ribbon” similarly uses the technique to take us back in time, but is less about recreating an era than it is about establishing a chokehold of fatalistic austerity.

“The Man Who Wasn’t There” is another period piece, but the lack of color in the Coen brothers’ film — which was shot in color and then bled dry — assumes a moral quality, making Billy Bob Thornton
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes 2016: Full jury announced

Today, the full jury for the 69th Cannes Film Festival was announced. The announcement comes after George Miller (Mad Max: Fury Road) was confirmed to head up the jury for this year’s festival, which kicks off in the south of France in just a couple of weeks.

Joining Miller are:

Arnaud Desplechin (Director, Writer – France), Kirsten Dunst (Actress – United States), Valeria Golino (Actress, Director, Writer, Producer – Italia), Mads Mikkelsen (Actor – Denmark), László Nemes (Director, Writer – Hungaria), Vanessa Paradis (Actress, Singer- France) ,Katayoon Shahabi (Producer – Iran), and Donald Sutherland (Actor – Canada).

Keep it Thn over the newxt few weeks for extensive Cannes coverage, which kicks off from May 11th, 2016.

Here’s the full press release.

Cannes has always sought to adopt a universal and international approach, and in tune with this tradition, George Miller will be surrounded by eight luminaries of world cinema, from Iran, Denmark, United States, Italia, France,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Cannes reveals Competition jury

  • ScreenDaily
Cannes reveals Competition jury
Donald Sutherland, Arnaud Desplechin, Vanessa Paradis among those to join president George Miller.

The 69th Cannes Film Festival jury, presided over by Mad Max director George Miller, will be made up of eight luminaries of world cinema, from Iran, Denmark, United States, Italy, France, Canada and Hungary.

The jury, made up of four women and four men, will comprise a collection of directors, actors and writers. They will decide on the prizes for the 21 films in Competition.

The jury:

George Miller – President

(Director, Writer, Producer – Australia)

Arnaud Desplechin (Director, Writer – France)

Kirsten Dunst (Actress– United States)

Valeria Golino (Actress, Director, Writer, Producer – Italia)

Mads Mikkelsen (Actor – Denmark)

László Nemes (Director, Writer – Hungaria)

Vanessa Paradis (Actress, Singer – France)

Katayoon Shahabi (Producer – Iran)

Donald Sutherland (Actor – Canada)

Arnaud Desplechin, Director, Writer (France)

Arnaud Desplechin became an official competitor at Cannes with The Sentinel, his first feature film. He then made My Sex Life… or How I Got
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes reveals 2016 jury

  • ScreenDaily
Cannes reveals 2016 jury
Donald Sutherland, Arnaud Desplechin, Vanessa Paradis among those to join president George Miller.

The 69th Cannes Film Festival, presided over by Mad Max director George Miller, will comprise eight luminaries of world cinema, from Iran, Denmark, United States, Italy, France, Canada and Hungary.

The jury, made up of four women and four men, comprises directors, actors and writers.

The jury:

George Miller – President

(Director, Writer, Producer – Australia)

Arnaud Desplechin (Director, Writer – France)

Kirsten Dunst (Actress– United States)

Valeria Golino (Actress, Director, Writer, Producer – Italia)

Mads Mikkelsen (Actor – Denmark)

László Nemes (Director, Writer – Hungaria)

Vanessa Paradis (Actress, Singer – France)

Katayoon Shahabi (Producer – Iran)

Donald Sutherland (Actor – Canada)

Arnaud Desplechin, Director, Writer (France)

Arnaud Desplechin became an official competitor at Cannes with The Sentinel, his first feature film. He then made My Sex Life… or How I Got into an Argument, which introduced a new generation of actors. The artists in his films have regularly been awarded the most
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes 2016 Reveals Competition Jury With George Miller, Kirsten Dunst, Mads Mikkelsen & More

We have what should now be the full line-up for the 2016 Cannes Film Festival, featuring many of our most-anticipated films of the year. Coming next in line is the announcement of the competition jury, which director George Miller will be presiding over, returning to Cannes after delivering one of the best films of the festival last year, Mad Max: Fury Road.

Made up of four women and five men, they include Arnaud Desplechin (returning after last year’s My Golden Days), Kristen Dunst, Italian actress Valeria Golino, Mad Mikkelsen (Cannes Best Actor winner for The Hunt), Grand Prix-winning Son of Saul director László Nemes, actress/singer Vanessa Paradis, Iranian producer Katayoon Shahabi, as well as actor Donald Sutherland. Check out their biographies below as we look forward to seeing what they award the Palme d’Or, and beyond.

Arnaud Desplechin, Director, Writer (France)

Arnaud Desplechin became an official competitor at Cannes with The Sentinel,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Patrice Leconte: ‘I’m Not a Reporter-style Filmmaker, I Bear Witness to My Emotions, Not to My Time’

Patrice Leconte: ‘I’m Not a Reporter-style Filmmaker, I Bear Witness to My Emotions, Not to My Time’
With a 40-year career, spanning 30 films, Patrice Leconte is one of France’s most versatile and accomplished directors, with credits including cult pics “Monsieur Hire,” “Ridicule” and “The Hairdresser’s Husband.” He delights in shifting genres and filming styles from one project to the next. In 2012 he directed his first animation feature, “The Suicide Shop”, having previously dabbled in animation and cartoons during his teenage years and in his first job as a cartoonist for the Franco-Belgian comics magazine Pilote. His penultimate picture, the romantic drama “A Promise,” starring Alan Rickman and Rebecca Hall, was his first English-language production. His most recent film “Do Not Disturb,” with Christian Clavier and Carole Bouquet, which opened 2015’s UniFrance Rendez-vous with French Cinema on Jan. 15, was shot with a handheld camera.

On January 28, he delivered a masterclass in the Paris Images Pro event – his first masterclass on French soil, having previously participated in
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Patrice Leconte on ‘Do Not Disturb,’ Christian Clavier, the Self-Centeredness of Modern Life

Patrice Leconte on ‘Do Not Disturb,’ Christian Clavier, the Self-Centeredness of Modern Life
Bowing Dec. 31 in France, the Wild Bunch-sold “Do Not Disturb,” re-twinning Patrice Leconte and Christian Clavier, the latter hot off “Bad (Serial) Weddings,” looks set to Leconte his best box office in a near-decade, a first-two-weekends 680,897 tix sold – broadly €4.4 million ($5.3 million), for Wild Bunch Distribution. That might be expected. Produced by Olivier Delbosc and Marc Missonnier at Fidelite Films, adapting Florian Zeller’s French stage play, itself inspired by Simon Gray’s “Otherwise Engaged,” first directed by Harold Pinter, “Do Not Disturb” features a strong ensemble – Carole Bouquet (“That Obscure Object of Desire,” ”Wasabi”), Valerie Bonneton (“Eyjafjallajökull”) and Rossy de Palma (“Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown”), for instance. In it, Clavier plays Michel, a well-heeled dentist and jazz buff, who stumbles on a rare find, the original L.P. of a New Orleans jazz session in 1958, called, not coincidentally, “Me, Myself and I.” He settles down in his lavish living room,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Awkwardly Scripted, A Promise Is Plagued With Uninspired Performances

Awkwardly Scripted, A Promise Is Plagued With Uninspired Performances
No bodices were harmed in veteran French filmmaker Patrice Leconte's chaste and bloodless English-language debut, a love-triangle costume drama that never sparks the artful sensuality found in his earlier hits like The Girl on the Bridge, Ridicule, or The Hairdresser's Husband.

Perhaps diluted in translation, this awkwardly scripted adaptation of Stefan Zweig's novella Journey into the Past casts Anglo-Saxon actors in Belgium as an austere stand-in for cusp-of-wwi Germany. Recognizing ingenuity and dedication in his newest employee, steelworks baron Karl Hoffmeister (Alan Rickman, stately and bored) quickly promotes modest engineering prodigy Friedrich Zeitz (Richard Madden, a handsome wet noodle) to be his personal secretary.

Herr Hoffmeis...
See full article at Village Voice »

Review: Patrice Leconte's Edgeless Drama 'A Promise' Starring Rebecca Hall

He’s fallen out of favor a bit in the last few years, but there was a time when Patrice Leconte was one of the most popular foreign filmmakers in the U.S. While he was never a favorite with the hipper critics, over the 1990s and early 2000s, films like “Ridicule,” “ The Girl On The Bridge,” “The Man On The Train” and “Intimate Strangers” became staples on the festival circuit, won BAFTAs and Cesars, and became sizeable arthouse hits. But the director’s recent films like “Beauties At War” and “The Suicide Shop” have struggled to find audiences at home and abroad, and so Leconte seems to have made another ploy for a bigger crowd: at the age of 66, he’s made his English-language debut. And with an impressive cast mixing veteran performers with rising stars, and source material from “Letter To An Unknown Woman” author Stefan Zweig, it
See full article at The Playlist »

Venice Review: Patrice Leconte’s ‘A Promise’ Starring Rebecca Hall, Richard Madden & Alan Rickman

He’s fallen out of favor a bit in the last few years, but there was a time when Patrice Leconte was one of the most popular foreign filmmakers in the U.S. While he was never a favorite with the hipper critics, over the 1990s and early 2000s, films like “Ridicule,” “ The Girl On The Bridge,” “The Man On The Train” and “Intimate Strangers” became staples on the festival circuit, won BAFTAs and Cesars, and became sizeable arthouse hits. But the director’s recent films like “Beauties At War” and “The Suicide Shop” have struggled to find audiences at home or abroad, and so Leconte seems to have made another ploy for a bigger crowd: at the age of 66, he’s made his English-language debut. And with an impressive cast mixing veteran performers with rising stars, and source material from “Letter To An Unknown Woman” author Stefan Zweig, it
See full article at The Playlist »

A Promise: Venice Review

A Promise: Venice Review
Venice -- Veteran French director Patrice Leconte’s career has been littered with international art-house successes in which sensuality played an important role, from The Hairdresser’s Husband to Girl on the Bridge. Which makes the emotional and sexual tepidness of his first English-language film, A Promise, all the more disappointing. The chief shortcoming is a stunning absence of chemistry between the two most ardent points of the period drama’s romantic triangle, but this is a limp misfire in every respect. Adapted by Jerome Tonnerre and Leconte from Stefan Zweig’s posthumously published novella Journey Into the Past, the film strands Rebecca Hall in

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Director & Actor Teams: The Overlooked & Underrated (Part 1 of 2)

Cinema is a kind of uber-art form that’s made up of a multitude of other forms of art including writing, directing, acting, drawing, design, photography and fashion. As such, film is, as all cinema aficionados know, a highly collaborative venture.

One of the most consistently fascinating collaborations in cinema is that of the director and actor.

This article will examine some of the great director & actor teams. It’s important to note that this piece is not intended as a film history survey detailing all the generally revered collaborations.

There is a wealth of information and study available on such duos as John Ford & John Wayne, Howard Hawks & John Wayne, Elia Kazan & Marlon Brando, Akira Kurosawa & Toshiro Mifune, Alfred Hitchcock & James Stewart, Ingmar Bergman & Max Von Sydow, Federico Fellini & Giulietta Masina/Marcello Mastroianni, Billy Wilder & Jack Lemmon, Francis Ford Coppola & Al Pacino, Woody Allen & Diane Keaton, Martin Scorsese & Robert DeNiro
See full article at SoundOnSight »

TV5MONDE USA: May Brings Films of Discovery

Tune in alert for self-discovery and surprise revelations abound in May with TV5MONDE USA. Daniel Auteuil, Quelques Jours Avec Lui (2012) May 15, 1:05pm Edt / 10:05am Pdt Two-time César award (Girl on the Bridge, Jean de Florette), Cannes Film Festival (The Eighth Day) and BAFTA Film Award (Jean de Florette) winner Daniel Auteuil is the focal point of this documentary about self-discovery. Over his forty-year career, Daniel Auteuil has played a thousand roles, including the under-gifted Bebel, for Claude Zidi; Scapin, for Jean-Pierre Vincent; and Ugolin, for Claude Berri. At age 63, after recognizing all of his success, the actor admits he wants to talk a little bit about himself after spending his life hiding behind characters.
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

The Most Star-Studded Cannes Jury Ever?

Cannes 2013 jury Steven Spielberg was named the president of the Cannes Film Festival 2013 jury a few weeks ago. Earlier today, festival organizers announced Spielberg’s fellow jury members. It’s a star-studded international cast: Asian Film Award nominee and Indian Film Academy winner Vidya Balan (The Dirty Picture), Cannes Film Festival Grand Prix winner Naomi Kawase (The Mourning Forest), Academy Award winner and three-time nominee Nicole Kidman (Moulin Rouge!, The Hours, Rabbit Hole), and BAFTA winner Lynne Ramsay (Swimmer, We Need to Talk About Kevin). Also: Cannes Film Festival and two-time César winner Daniel Auteuil (The Eighth Day, Girl on the Bridge, Jean de Florette), two-time Academy Award winner Ang Lee (Brokeback Mountain, Life of Pi), Cannes’ 2007 Palme d’Or and 2012 Best Screenplay winner Cristian Mungiu (4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days; Beyond the Hills), and two-time Oscar winner Christoph Waltz (Inglourious Basterds, Django Unchained). Those listed above will select the winners
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Lead Actors: The Overlooked and Underrated

This article is dedicated to Andrew Copp: filmmaker, film writer, artist and close friend who passed away on January 19, 2013. You are loved and missed, brother.

****

Looking at the Best Actor Academy Award nominations for the film year 2012, the one miss that clearly cries out for more attention is Liam Neeson’s powerful performance in Joe Carnahan’s excellent survival film The Grey, easily one of the best roles of Neeson’s career.

In Neeson’s case, his lack of a nomination was a case of neglect similar to the Albert Brooks snub in the Best Supporting Actor category for the film year 2011 for Drive(Nicolas Winding Refn, USA).

Along with negligence, other factors commonly prevent outstanding lead acting performances from getting the kind of critical attention they deserve. Sometimes it’s that the performance is in a film not considered “Oscar material” or even worthy of any substantial critical attention.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Wood Joins 10 Things I Hate About Life

Wood Joins 10 Things I Hate About Life
In May, word broke that writer-director Gil Junger was going back to the 10 Things... well for 10 Things I Hate About Life, a film that is less direct sequel and more spiritual follow-up. Hayley Atwell appeared set to star in the movie. Now, though, Deadline reports that Evan Rachel Wood is locked into a lead role and there’s no mention of Captain America’s Peggy.Wood will play a young woman who meets a guy just as they’re both attempting to commit suicide. As they bond over their shared miserable lives, they discover something worth staying around for."It is the story of two relatable, ordinary people with normal jobs and normal desires whose seemingly great lives have become unmanageable," Junger told Variety when the story first broke. " Their chance meeting is so awkward, so raw, and so funny, they postpone their intentions and go their separate ways."It
See full article at EmpireOnline »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites