Columbo (1971–2003)
7.5/10
917
15 user 4 critic

Ashes to Ashes 

After a much maligned Hollywood gossip columnist is murdered by her former lover, Columbo tries to find a way to prove he was responsible for the crime.

Director:

Writers:

(created by), (created by) | 1 more credit »
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
...
...
...
Fred
...
...
Sheik Yarami
...
Eddie Fenelle (as Ron Másak)
...
Rita
Scott N. Stevens ...
Gerald
...
...
Henry Chalfont (as Conrad Bachman)
...
Singer
...
Driver
Edit

Storyline

Hollywood gossip reporter, Verity Chandler is planning her next expose. Which is to reveal how famed mortician, Eric Prince built his empire. When she reveals to Prince her plans he kills her. He then places her in the casket of a man scheduled to be cremated. And cremates her. He then goes to her house and changes the story she was working on to make it seem someone else wanted to get her. When no one hears from her, the police are called in and Lt. Columbo is on the job. Eentually he learns that she went to a funeral at Prince's and talks to him. And he finds his behavior odd. Written by rcs0411@yahoo.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

8 October 1998 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

While filming a "Colombo - 'Ashes to Ashes' " (Movie of the Week in the Spring of 1998) at Universal-MCA Film City-Studios, Rue McClanahan performed in a guest role, as 'Verity Chandler' - a nasty devious miserably wicked evil tongued Hollywood gossip columnist - on Peter Falk's "Columbo" MOW prime-time-network special. The film was written by, directed, and featured actor Patrick McGoohan - as Eric Prince, seething with resentment of his ex-lover Verity, murderous and bloodthirsty for revenge. During breaks in filming, Rue McClanahan related to Falk's production designer Hub Braden's question when asked - "In 'The Golden Girls' series - how much did each of the featured performers contribute, ad-lib, improvise in their first Monday sit-down read of their dialogue for their character's role?" McClanahan's response was a matter-of-fact statement to his inquiry! "Not much! Bea Arthur arrived in the rehearsal hall, just sat at the conference table and read her lines. Ditto for Estelle Getty. Betty White and myself would interject comments, and usually, our ad-lib/improv dialogue ideas were noted, accepted by Susan Harris, with our spontaneous line idea interjected into our current script. Bea Arthur performed, reading exactly, what she had been given to say; the same, as well - with Estelle. Betty and myself were usually animated in our dialogue readings, bouncing off with an ad-lib or other flippant dialogue. We all delivered our lines exactly as scripted in our final live television performances. We never improvised in filming. Bea and Estelle were full-filling their acting-job during rehearsals and performances! We were all very professional!". See more »

Goofs

During the first 5 minutes of the film, Verity (played by Rue McClanahan) attends a funeral. She kisses the deceased who is lying in an open casket and leaves a red lipstick mark on his face. The mortician's female assistant is immediately instructed to remove the mark. When she does, the deceased's face visibly flinches as the stain is rubbed off his face with a tissue. See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
First-class Columbo comedy-mystery
19 June 2003 | by (New York, NY) – See all my reviews

A tremendous cast, by latter-day Columbo standards, including Rue McClanahan, Sally Kellerman, Edie McClurg, Richard Libertini, Aubrey Morris, and Ron Masak have a field day chewing up the scenery in clever scene after clever scene. Legendary tap dancer Arthur Duncan even shows up to add the proper element of theatre d'absurd to the proceedings. The dialogue is well-above average in the cleverness department as well. The twists and turns are ingenious. McGoohan has a field day as director and actor. The last line puts the proper icing on the cake. This is one of the very best of the latter-day Columbo movies.


23 of 23 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?