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A Window on Washington Park (1913)

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From his apartment, where he lives a cheerless widower's life, overlooking Washington Park, Alan Dale sees a refined, but poverty-stricken old gentleman on one of the park benches. Calling ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
Charles Kent ...
A Lonely Old Man
Tom Powers ...
Courtenay Foote ...
The Old Man as a Youth
Florence Turner ...
The Old Man's Daughter
Leo Delaney ...
The Old Man's Daughter's Husband
Sidney Cummings
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Storyline

From his apartment, where he lives a cheerless widower's life, overlooking Washington Park, Alan Dale sees a refined, but poverty-stricken old gentleman on one of the park benches. Calling his butler, he instructs him to go down and tell the old man he would like to see him. When the butler approaches the elderly man the old fellow is somewhat skeptical, but finally consents to go with him. Alan receives his guest cordially and tells him why he has requested him to come and invites him to dinner. During the meal the old man tells his life's story: how he married a young woman, and after the birth of a little daughter, she died. How his daughter had married a young fellow and gone to live in New York, and how he had lost his money. The last news he had received of her was of her death. As he recites his story visions of the events appear before us and we have no trouble following them. Alan, at the conclusion of the story, eagerly grasps the old gentleman's hand and tells him that he ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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Release Date:

30 April 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Wherefore Stopp'st Thou Me?
1 August 2012 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

Although shot and directed in the standard excellent style of the Vitagraph Studio in this period, the way this melodrama is constructed shows definite signs of padding as well as very slow performances by the actors -- although that may be due to its transference at 16 frames per second. The story is about how her father forbids Florence Turner from marrying a young artist. She runs off with him and many years later her father is still looking for her. It's told within a frame of his recounting the history to a young millionaire and it is very title heavy -- always a sign that something has gone wrong in silent cinema.

There's always some interest to me to see location shooting around New York from a hundred years ago. The Little Church Around the Corner is still there, looking much the same and the brownstones on Washington Square North are recognizable -- even if the millionaires left decades ago when NYU bought them up for student housing. If you want to see for yourself, it's available for viewing on the National Film Preservation website.


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