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A Vitagraph Romance (1912)

"Senator Carter's daughter leaves home and enters the employ of the Vitagraph Company as an actress. After waiting wistfully for her return, Senator Carter passes a theatre one day and sees... See full summary »

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Cast

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Charles Mackay - a Young Author - Caroline's Sweetheart
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Caroline - the Senator's Daughter
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Senator Carter of Montana
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Principal of Miss Flint's Seminary
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James Young
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Florence Turner
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J. Stuart Blackton
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Maurice Costello
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Edith Storey
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Lillian Walker
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Albert E. Smith
Ruth Owen ...
Ruth Owen
William T. Rock ...
William T. Rock
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Storyline

"Senator Carter's daughter leaves home and enters the employ of the Vitagraph Company as an actress. After waiting wistfully for her return, Senator Carter passes a theatre one day and sees his daughter featured in one the "Movies." He goes to the studio and after being shown through the plant he finds his daughter and reconciliation takes place. Besides being an interesting drama, the picture shows in detail the entire plant of the Vitagraph Company." SOURCE: newspaper advertisement (March 07,1913) Written by Anonymous

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Short | Drama

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18 September 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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I Wanna Be in Pictures
15 May 2016 | by See all my reviews

When Clara Kimball Young meets a handsome writer on Coney Island, her father the Senator orders her to break it off. However, when she becomes a screen star for Vitagraph, he cannot but agree.

While today we seem to hold people who are young and good looking enough to be worthy of discoursing on any subject they wish, because we see them on the movie screen and this makes them very intelligent, this is a new idea. A century ago to be an actress was to be thought likely a whore, and movie actors were deemed to be incompetent of that. So Vitagraph, with its often charming quaintness when it came to ideas of romance, offered this as a charming corrective. It's a pleasing trifle and pleasantly done in a dozen minutes.


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