"The Sopranos"
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany creditsepisode listepisodes castepisode ratings... by rating... by votes
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsmessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summaryplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 101 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


‘Mad Men’ Creator Matt Weiner on Turning Early Critics’ Barbs Into Success

17 April 2015 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

As AMC prepares to air the “Mad Men” finale May 17, the show’s creator, Matt Weiner, harks back to his debut, 1996 microbudget film “What Do You Do All Day?” that he wrote, produced, directed and starred in. A Variety critic slammed the picture, but Weiner talked about how that whole experience fueled his subsequent work.

Talk about your early career.

I made an independent film before I started my life in television, and it actually helped me get my career started. It was a $12,000 movie. I’m in it, my wife’s in it, my car’s in it. It’s a strung-together, black-and-white movie. We sent it off to some film festivals, it premiered at Santa Barbara, and Variety ran a review.

Did you read Variety in those days?

I grew up in Los Angeles, and Variety has this sort of iconic quality. To be in Variety seemed to »

- Variety Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Wigging Out: Great pop culture hairpiece moments from 'Americans,' 'Melrose' & more

16 April 2015 4:16 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Last night's "The Americans" included a moment where one of the spies removed their wig to dramatic effect. Between that and a similar "How to Get Away with Murder" scene from earlier this season, it's been quite the year for powerful wig removals. That has me thinking about other moments from TV and movies that drew big emotion — or comedy — from wigs or toupees coming off at a particular moment, including (loads of old show spoilers coming, involving both lack of hair and, at times, lack of life), with links or embeds where available... "Melrose Place": Kimberly lets her hair down In the show that defined watercooler television for much of the '90s, no moment was crazier, or more talked about, than Marcia Cross's Kimberly revealing the literal scars she wears that will lead her to wreak vengeance on Michael and so many other residents of that apartment complex. »

- Alan Sepinwall

Permalink | Report a problem


We Need to Stop Asking David Chase to Explain That 'Sopranos' Ending

15 April 2015 10:52 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

The smash cut to black, that black hole of an ending, is one of the best things about "The Sopranos," the series that spawned the Golden Age of television almost two decades ago and yet still rivals the cultural reach and meme-worthiness of "Game of Thrones," "Mad Men," "True Detective" and "Breaking Bad." David Chase, who has yet to achieve something so towering since the show ended in 2007, finally owned up critically to the last scene in DGA Quarterly with a cleverly wending shot-by-shot analysis that of course circumvents the central question gnawing at us all: does Tony Soprano die? It is unproductive to keep begging David Chase for an answer to this question. It's a mystery that Chase will never publicly dissolve, and one even the most ardent of close readers will never satisfyingly put to rest, so let's let it linger. Meadow arrives late, flustered, to family dinner at Holsten's, »

- Ryan Lattanzio

Permalink | Report a problem


We Need to Stop Asking David Chase to Explain That 'Sopranos' Ending

15 April 2015 10:52 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The smash cut to black, that black hole of an ending, is one of the best things about "The Sopranos," the series that spawned the Golden Age of television almost two decades ago and yet still rivals the cultural reach and meme-worthiness of "Game of Thrones," "Mad Men," "True Detective" and "Breaking Bad." David Chase, who has yet to achieve something so towering since the show ended in 2007, finally owned up critically to the last scene in DGA Quarterly with a cleverly wending shot-by-shot analysis that of course circumvents the central question gnawing at us all: does Tony Soprano die? It is unproductive to keep begging David Chase for an answer to this question. It's a mystery that Chase will never publicly dissolve, and one even the most ardent of close readers will never satisfyingly put to rest, so let's let it linger. Meadow arrives late, flustered, to family dinner at Holsten's, »

- Ryan Lattanzio

Permalink | Report a problem


The Sopranos Ending, Shot By Shot, Not Explained By David Chase

15 April 2015 10:17 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Like the spinning top before Inception, the finale to The Sopranos is (and should) be argued over for all time. Like the Journey song that glosses the sequence, it goes on and on and on and on. Tony is Schrodinger’s Gangster. But the question of his ultimate fate isn’t nearly as fascinating as David Chase‘s scene-by-scene breakdown of the show’s finale moments. The structure, the framing of the family all together for one last time, the casual ambiguity, and, yes, the on-the-nose nature that Chase swears by. Tony’s flipping through the jukebox; it’s almost like the soundtrack of his life, because he sees various songs. No matter what song we picked, I wanted it to be a song that would have been from Tony’s high school years, or his youth. That’s what he would have played. If you’re re-watching it, the rhythm is of unparalleled importance. The »

- Scott Beggs

Permalink | Report a problem


The Sopranos finale: David Chase doesn't owe us an explanation

15 April 2015 10:16 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Eight years after wrapping up one of the best shows in TV history, its creator still finds himself having to justify its final scene – but there’s really no need

Mad Men is ending in several weeks and there is considerable pressure on Matthew Weiner to find a suitable way to end his groundbreaking series. Most of that pressure comes from the outsize reaction that his mentor, David Chase, unknowingly prevoked in 2007 when he ended The Sopranos with a famous scene that cuts away in the middle of the action leaving the audience to figure out Tony Soprano’s definite fate.

The decision was hotly contested at the time (thankfully Twitter didn’t exist back then), and it is still a sore spot among some fans and constantly debated whenever any big, important series eventually comes to a close. Eight years later, David Chase is still explaining himself and his decisions, »

- Brian Moylan

Permalink | Report a problem


David Chase Says 'The Sopranos' Finale "Was Very Simple And Much More On The Nose Than People Think"

15 April 2015 9:25 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Yes, it has been eight years since "The Sopranos" ended, and we are still talking about that ending. Creator/writer/director David Chase has long maintained a cryptic silence on the fate of Tony Soprano. And it speaks to how much that ending mystified viewers, that when Chase suggested last year Tony Soprano wasn't dead, his reps had to get involved and say his comments were taken out of context. Now, he's been given a chance to break down that final sequence, shot-by-shot, for DGA. But really, for all the theories about the ending, the answer can be found in Journey's "Don't Stop Believing" playing on the jukebox. Read More: 'The Sopranos' Creator David Chase's Must See Movies Include 'Barry Lyndon,' 'Bicycle Thieves,' 'Something Wild' & More "I thought the ending would be somewhat jarring, sure. But not to the extent it was, »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


David Chase Says 'The Sopranos' Finale "Was Very Simple And Much More On The Nose Than People Think"

15 April 2015 9:25 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Yes, it has been eight years since "The Sopranos" ended, and we are still talking about that ending. Creator/writer/director David Chase has long maintained a cryptic silence on the fate of Tony Soprano. And it speaks to how much that ending mystified viewers, that when Chase suggested last year Tony Soprano wasn't dead, his reps had to get involved and say his comments were taken out of context. Now, he's been given a chance to break down that final sequence, shot-by-shot, for DGA. But really, for all the theories about the ending, the answer can be found in Journey's "Don't Stop Believing" playing on the jukebox. Read More: 'The Sopranos' Creator David Chase's Must See Movies Include 'Barry Lyndon,' 'Bicycle Thieves,' 'Something Wild' & More "I thought the ending would be somewhat jarring, sure. But not to the extent it was, »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


Now that David Chase Has Spoken On the 'Sopranos' Finale, Can We All Let it Go?

15 April 2015 8:57 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Read More: Why David Chase Is Right About Not Answering the Big 'Sopranos' Question "Life is short. Either it ends here for Tony or some other time. But in spite of that, it's really worth it. So don't stop believing." The quote comes from David Chase, whose exhaustive and fascinating analysis of "The Sopranos"' ending scene was recently published in DGA Quarterly (the Directors Guild of America's official magazine) to, predictably, a whole lot of fanfare. At this point, it seems that the "Sopranos" mastermind can't get a word in on the final episode without endless speculation as to whether he may have finally revealed the fate of Tony Soprano. Last year, Vox's Martha P. Nochimson caused a firestorm on social media when she reported that his answer to the "Did Tony Soprano die?" question was a blunt "no." Of course, immediately afterward, David Chase's representative pushed against that assertion. »

- David Canfield

Permalink | Report a problem


Now that David Chase Has Spoken On the 'Sopranos' Finale, Can We All Let it Go?

15 April 2015 8:57 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Why David Chase Is Right About Not Answering the Big 'Sopranos' Question "Life is short. Either it ends here for Tony or some other time. But in spite of that, it's really worth it. So don't stop believing." The quote comes from David Chase, whose exhaustive and fascinating analysis of "The Sopranos"' ending scene was recently published in DGA Quarterly (the Directors Guild of America's official magazine) to, predictably, a whole lot of fanfare. At this point, it seems that the "Sopranos" mastermind can't get a word in on the final episode without endless speculation as to whether he may have finally revealed the fate of Tony Soprano. Last year, Vox's Martha P. Nochimson caused a firestorm on social media when she reported that his answer to the "Did Tony Soprano die?" question was a blunt "no." Of course, immediately afterward, David Chase's representative pushed against that assertion. »

- David Canfield

Permalink | Report a problem


So Is He Dead?! The Sopranos Creator David Chase Sheds Some Light on That Series Finale Ending

15 April 2015 8:30 AM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

You remember the ending to The Sopranos. How could you forget? In case you Did forget, it had Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini) waiting for his family in a local diner. Carmela (Edie Falco) walked in. A.J. (Robert Iler) walked in. Meadow (Jamie-Lynn Sigler) parked. Tension built. "Don't Stop Believin'" played. Refresh your memory. Ok, refreshed? Series creator David Chase recently dissected that scene shot by shot and it will give Sopranos fans quite a bit of insight into what the much-discussed ending. But no, there's no definitive answer about whether or not Tony died at the end. "I said to Gandolfini, the bell rings and you look up. That last shot of Tony ends on 'don't stop,' »

Permalink | Report a problem


David Chase Has Explained the Ending of 'The Sopranos' Again. Maybe He Should Stop Explaining

15 April 2015 7:45 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

In an interview with the Directors Guild of America's DGA Quarterly, David Chase goes granular on "The Sopranos'" famous final sequence, laying out in great detail why he made the choices he did. It's a fascinating read, revealing how Chase deliberately packed the simple act of a family meal with a sense of almost mythic significance, using the songs in Tony's jukebox as a way to evoke the span of his life, and how the scene's rhythms and even its visuals were directly inspired by Chase's choice of song. Not surprisingly, the bulk of the attention has fallen on the article's final paragraphs, where Chase once again lays out his reasons for the series-ending cut to black: I said to Gandolfini, the bell rings and you look up. That last shot of Tony ends on "Don't stop," it's mid-song. I'm not going to go into [if that's Tony's Pov]. I thought the possibility »

- Sam Adams

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Sopranos’ Creator David Chase Finally Reveals Shot-by-Shot Breakdown of Series’ End Scene

15 April 2015 7:45 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

The Sopranos” creator David Chase gave a shot-by-shot breakdown of the now infamous final scene of his New Jersery mafia saga in a recent interview. In an article published in DGA Quarterly, Chase said that the music for the scene, Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin'” was meant to reflect part of Tony Soprano’s past. “Tony’s flipping through the jukebox; it’s almost like the soundtrack of his life,” Chase said. “No matter what song we picked, I wanted it to be a song that would have been from Tony’s high school years, or his youth. That »

- Joe Otterson

Permalink | Report a problem


There Is No ‘Answer’ to the End of The Sopranos

15 April 2015 7:24 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

This piece originally ran in August 2014. We are rerunning it after David Chase was recently asked to walk through The Sopranos' final scene for the Directors Guild. In response to a Vox piece headlined, "Did Tony die at the end of The Sopranos?," David Chase sent the following statement through his publicist: "A journalist for Vox misconstrued what David Chase said in their interview. To simply quote David as saying, 'Tony Soprano is not dead,' is inaccurate. There is a much larger context for that statement and as such, it is not true. As David Chase has said numerous times on the record, 'Whether Tony Soprano is alive or dead is not the point.' To continue to search for this answer is fruitless. The final scene of The Sopranos raises a spiritual question that has no right or wrong answer.” It's a compliment to The Sopranos and »

- Matt Zoller Seitz

Permalink | Report a problem


David Chase breaks silence on Sopranos' final scene

15 April 2015 5:38 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

David Chase has broken down The Sopranos final scene in an extended interview...

Spoilers for The Sopranos ending lie ahead.

The last episode of The Sopranos is one of the most debated endings in TV history. Some people were infuriated by it, others thought it was brilliant. On June 10, 2007, Steve Perry stopped believing, the onion rings were finished and Tony Soprano gave a quick glance at a passing stranger in a Member’s Only jacket.

David Chase, brought The Sopranos into this world and took them out. He directed the Made In America episode. He always maintained that everything you needed to know about the fate of Tony Soprano was on that screen so stop asking.

But when DGA Quarterly asked Chase, he gave a shot-by-shot explanation of what he put on the plate.

"When it's over," Chase told DGA, "I think you're probably always blindsided by it. That's all I can say. »

- louisamellor

Permalink | Report a problem


David Chase Didn’t Think the ‘Sopranos’ Finale Would Cause So Much Debate

14 April 2015 6:54 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The final few episodes of HBO’s mob drama “The Sopranos” are some of the most hotly contested ones in recent TV history: Did the episode’s fade to black mean that James Gandolfini’s “family” man Tony Soprano was taken out? Or is that final moment a way to tell viewers that Tony will spend his entire life second-guessing the motives of every person in the room?

Series creator David Chase directed the show’s finale, which aired in 2007. In the current issue of the Directors Guild magazine DGA Quarterly, he describes how he built tension with those final few frames as Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin'” plays in the background. But did he think they would have this much of an impact? Not really.

“I thought the ending would be somewhat jarring, sure,” he told the magazine. “But not to the extent it was, and not a subject of such discussion. »

- Whitney Friedlander

Permalink | Report a problem


David Chase Analyzes the Final Shot of The Sopranos

14 April 2015 4:40 PM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

There’s a lot of genuinely great TV on right now. Mad Men is in the midst of ending its final season, Game of Thrones is back, The Americans is flying under the radar, True Detective is returning this summer—and that’s just the tip of the iceberg. But if there were an “origin story” for this current Golden Age of Television, it would begin with The Sopranos. It’s still quite possibly the best TV show of all time, and it’s a testament to the HBO drama’s impact that folks are still discussing and debating its final scene nearly eight years after it first aired. Though he initially said he would never comment on the final scene of The Sopranos, creator David Chase has slowly-but-surely been working his way to discussing those last few moments and, begrudgingly, whether Tony Soprano died in that diner. [caption id="attachment_443583" align="alignright" width="360"] Image via HBO[/caption] »

- Adam Chitwood

Permalink | Report a problem


Don't stop believing? David Chase analyzes the final scene of 'The Sopranos'

14 April 2015 4:01 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Well, this is very cool. For the Director's Guild magazine, DGA Quarterly, "The Sopranos" creator David Chase analyzed every major shot of the series' oft-debated final scene. He discusses the focus on Members Only Guy at the counter, why he wanted to spend so much time on Meadow parallel-parking, and what he expected people to take from it. The whole thing's fascinating, but these last two passages in particular are very evocative, and both do and don't address the question of whether Tony died as the screen cut to black. I said to Gandolfini, the bell rings and you look up. That last shot of Tony ends on 'don't stop,' it's mid-song. I'm not going to go into [if that's Tony's Pov]. I thought the possibility would go through a lot of people's minds or maybe everybody's mind that he was killed. He might have gotten shot three years ago in that situation. »

- Alan Sepinwall

Permalink | Report a problem


Who Turned Down an Iconic The Sopranos Role?

9 April 2015 7:01 AM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

The Sopranos almost looked very different. Oscar nominee Lorraine Bracco, Dr. Jennifer Melfi, Tony Soprano's (James Gandolfini) psychiatrist on the hit HBO series, was originally offered a very different role: Carmela Soprano. So why did she turn down the role that eventually went to Edie Falco? "Because I did it in Goodfellas," Bracco told Watch What Happens Live host Andy Cohen Wednesday. "And I didn't think I could do it better. David [Chase] and I agreed with that, so I asked him if I could play Jennifer Melfi." Bracco played Karen Hill opposite Ray Liotta in Goodfellas and received Oscar and Golden Globe nominations for the role. "Plus, she wanted to sit," fellow Wwhl »

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Big Pussy Wants His Money in HBO Now Promo Clip

8 April 2015 9:35 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Watch: HBO Now is Here! John Oliver Explains How to Get Started (And Knocks 'Game of Thrones') HBO is celebrating the release of its standalone streaming service, HBO Now, with a hilarious promotional clip featuring the return of Paulie "Walnuts" Gualtieri (Tony Sirico) and Salvatore "Big Pussy" Bonpensiero (Vincent Pastore) of "The Sopranos" fame. In typical fashion, the two New Jersey gangsters can be seen wisecracking on their way to collect money from HBO fanatic Jake Caputo. If you'll recall, Caputo launched takemymoneyhbo.com in June 2012, a website devoted to people sharing the amount of money they would be willing to spend on a standalone HBO streaming platform. Within 48 hours of the website's launch, 163,673 people had joined Caputo in exclaiming, "Take my money, HBO!" With HBO Now officially ready for download on Apple devices, Paulie Walnuts and Big Pussy barge in on Caputo mid-interview and order »

- Zack Sharf

Permalink | Report a problem


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 101 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners