Crossfire (1982– )

TV Series  -  News | Talk-Show
3.6
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Ratings: 3.6/10 from 86 users  
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One of the leading political talk shows in America, this program combined in-depth discussion of current events and issues with just enough conflict added to spur arguments onward. For each... See full summary »

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Title: Crossfire (1982– )

Crossfire (1982– ) on IMDb 3.6/10

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Unknown  
2014   2013   2005   2004   … See all »
1 win & 4 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Series cast summary:
...
 Himself - Host / ... (61 episodes, 2013-2014)
Van Jones ...
 Himself - Host (60 episodes, 2013-2014)
S.E. Cupp ...
 Herself - Host / ... (49 episodes, 2013-2014)
Stephanie Cutter ...
 Herself - Host (35 episodes, 2013-2014)
...
 Himself (31 episodes, 2013-2014)
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Storyline

One of the leading political talk shows in America, this program combined in-depth discussion of current events and issues with just enough conflict added to spur arguments onward. For each show, four panelists, either journalists, politicians or other similarly connected with affairs of state, with a wide range of opinions and viewpoints, were brought together to debate the impact of past events, the wisdom of current activities, and the proper courses of action for the future. Written by Jean-Marc Rocher <rocher@fiberbit.net>

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News | Talk-Show

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Trivia

Was cancelled after Jon Stewart appeared on the show and criticized the hosts for turning the media into an agitprop screaming match. See more »

Quotes

Co-Host: Kerry won't come on this show. He will come on your show.
Jon Stewart: Right.
Co-Host: Let me suggest why he wants to come on your show.
Jon Stewart: Well, we have civilized discourse.
Co-Host: Well, here's an example of the civilized discourse. Here are three of the questions you asked John Kerry.
Jon Stewart: Yes.
Co-Host: You have a chance to interview the Democratic nominee. You asked him questions such as - quote - "How are you holding up? Is it hard not to take the attacks personally?"
Jon Stewart: Yes.
Co-Host: "Have you ever flip-flopped?" et cetera, et cetera.
Jon Stewart: Yes.
[...]
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Connections

Featured in Dave (1993) See more »

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User Reviews

A show where even discussion about the weather is partisan.
24 December 2004 | by (Orlando, Florida) – See all my reviews

"Crossfire" is a mind-numbingly poor excuse for political discussion. The show has been on CNN for quite awhile, but the recent hosts (as of 2004) are James Carville and Paul Begala representing the "left" (despite views that are not very progressive) and Robert Novak and Tucker "I wear this bow tie for maximum ass kissing" Carlson representing "the right" (although they tend to lean more toward the extreme right).

The rules are the following: you can't discuss anything, no matter how important, for more than two minutes. (Imagine how much meaningful debate can arise from this). It is a half-hour talk show, and something like a boxing ring bell sounds every time the hosts are supposed to move on to a new subject. Second, you can't do anything or say anything without having a bias position (notice they don't have anyone representing "independents" or "non-partisans"), so every situation is supposed to be clear cut, black and white: either Democratic or Republican in viewpoint. Third, if you're the host, no matter which side you sit on, you have to either pre-apologize for anything you say about another person (extreme political correctness) or you can't directly address the other person (James Carville almost never looks at Novak). And fourth, and this is the most important rule for the show, don't present real or unambiguous facts. That is why any counterargument generalizes about "liberals" or "conservatives" rather than addressing the issue at hand and any legitimate counterarguments. If it were a legitimate debate show, they would ask academics and other "experts" on their shows rather than the usual career politicians and other hacks.

If you have seen the recent documentary, "Outfoxed" and thought FOX was the only problem as far as corporate news networks and their failures to present meaningful political discussion and information rather than partisan bickering and mindless entertainment, then you probably haven't watched CNN, who seems to have taken the cue from FOX. To sum up what a poor mockery this show really is, check out the October 2004 (or November?) show when Jon Stewart was a guest. Shows like these encourage arbitrary extreme partisanship, and are responsible for the extreme competitiveness and polarization of most of the American populace. It doesn't matter what the situation is, what the facts are, shows like these only want you to keep two things in mind: there are two sides (and only two sides) to everything, and there is only one winner.


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