7.0/10
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310 user 110 critic

The Thirteenth Floor (1999)

A computer scientist running a virtual reality simulation of 1937 becomes the primary suspect when his colleague and mentor is murdered.

Director:

Writers:

(book) (as Daniel Galouye), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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4,426 ( 2,042)

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1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Detective Zev Bernstein
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Tom Jones
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Joe
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Jane's Lawyer
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Ellen
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Cop #1 (as Brad Henke)
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Bellhop
Venessia Valentino ...
Concierge
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Chauffeur
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Natasha's Roommate
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Storyline

Computer scientist Hannon Fuller has discovered something extremely important. He's about to tell the discovery to his colleague, Douglas Hall, but knowing someone is after him, the old man leaves a letter in the computer generated parallel world his company has created (which looks like the 30's with seemingly real people with real emotions). Fuller is murdered in our real world the same night, and his colleague is suspected. Douglas discovers a bloody shirt in his bathroom and he cannot recall what he was doing the night Fuller was murdered. He logs into the system in order to find the letter, but has to confront the unexpected. The truth is harsher than he could ever imagine... Written by Danny Rosenbluth

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Question reality. You can go there even though it doesn't exist.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

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Language:

Release Date:

28 May 1999 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The 13th Floor  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$16,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$4,278,452, 30 May 1999, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$15,500,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vincent D'Onofrio said that the theme of the movie was about wanting something that you couldn't have. See more »

Goofs

In the first scene of the film, Fuller writes the letter with a fountain pen. This is clear in the close-up where the "feed" is visible under the nib. It also has a cap. The pen is dipped into a desk inkwell. Fountain pens are never dipped into an inkwell. It is set down in a grove on the desk set, which would be a correct action for a dip pen, which it was not. See more »

Quotes

Jane Fuller: Why did you butcher those people?
Douglas Hall: Because it was fun!
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Crazy Credits

Before the opening credits, this René Descartes quote is seen on screen: "I think, therefore I am". See more »

Connections

References Blade Runner (1982) See more »

Soundtracks

Join Me In Death
by HIM
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User Reviews

 
Solid Science-Fiction.
9 September 2000 | by See all my reviews

This movie was both critically and financially panned. Why?

Two words. The Matrix.

The Thirteenth Floor is a good movie. No, it's not "The Matrix" all over again, but it wasn't trying to be. Comparing these two movies is like comparing Star Trek with Star Wars. Similar in aspects, but very different in others.

This is what happens when two movies of similar type are released in close proximity. The first one always has a jump-start on the second by means of box office success and pleasant reviews. That's why I think "The Thirteenth Floor" was branded as a bad movie. People had already seen "The Matrix" with it's knock-out special effects, cast and weren't open-minded for a movie on the same genre branch. So The 13th Floor was said to be 'a bland, pale imitation of the Matrix'.

Maybe "The Thirteenth Floor" doesn't have a star-studded cast - yes, it's cast is mostly regular supporting players, but they work well with the material. So there's no kung-fu ass kicking scenes, so what!

There's great atmosphere, a intriguing story and a real nice plot twist. To me that makes up a very fine movie. So I ask what was so very wrong with "The Thirteenth Floor" that made critics turn away and made it tank at the box office? Really it's people's unwillingness to give a similar movie a chance and instead opting to take the easy route and branding it as a "rip-off". Which is their loss unfortunately.


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