7.0/10
56,946
308 user 110 critic

The Thirteenth Floor (1999)

A computer scientist running a virtual reality simulation of 1937 becomes the primary suspect when his colleague and mentor is murdered.

Director:

Writers:

(book) (as Daniel Galouye), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Detective Zev Bernstein
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Tom Jones
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Joe
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Jane's Lawyer
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Ellen
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Cop #1 (as Brad Henke)
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Bellhop
Venessia Valentino ...
Concierge
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Chauffeur
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Natasha's Roommate
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Storyline

Computer scientist Hannon Fuller has discovered something extremely important. He's about to tell the discovery to his colleague, Douglas Hall, but knowing someone is after him, the old man leaves a letter in the computer generated parallel world his company has created (which looks like the 30's with seemingly real people with real emotions). Fuller is murdered in our real world the same night, and his colleague is suspected. Douglas discovers a bloody shirt in his bathroom and he cannot recall what he was doing the night Fuller was murdered. He logs into the system in order to find the letter, but has to confront the unexpected. The truth is harsher than he could ever imagine... Written by Danny Rosenbluth

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Question reality. You can go there even though it doesn't exist.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

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Language:

Release Date:

28 May 1999 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The 13th Floor  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$16,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$4,278,452, 30 May 1999, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$15,500,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

There are several references that the song "Timewave Zero" by Grendel used from this movie. One example is the quote "They think, they work, they eat.";"They fuck." in the dialogue between Whitney and detective McBain. Also, in the dialogue between Ashton and Douglas near the end, when Ashton switched with Whitney: Ashton said: "What did you do to the world?" "Turned it off." "Then put it back!". These are the same lines as in the beginning of Timewave Zero. See more »

Goofs

After Douglas Hall returns from his first trip into the system, Whitney examines and queries him while wearing a stethoscope around his neck. After a cut near the end of the conversation he is suddenly wearing it in his ears. See more »

Quotes

Jane Fuller: Why did you butcher those people?
Douglas Hall: Because it was fun!
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Crazy Credits

Before the opening credits, this René Descartes quote is seen on screen: "I think, therefore I am". See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Benchwarmers (2006) See more »

Soundtracks

Easy Come, Easy Go
Written by Edward Heyman and Johnny Green
Performed by Hadda Brooks
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User Reviews

Thought-provoking and intriguing without being pretentious.
21 January 2001 | by See all my reviews

The film, without an A-list cast, pulls off the plot well. The characters, although not really deep, are well structured, and the plot constructed with subtle complexity. The 1930s scenes are dramatically created. I found myself trying to guess the plot twists, but with little success as they unfolded. It was a good film, and richer in substance than the Matrix, and left you with a thought provoking afterthought about our own existence. Going into a movie, I hope to have avoided any prior information about the plot, and this one was well worth the purchase of the video. This could have made a great 3 hour movie to really develop the characters and the philosophical issues, however, it was reduced down to the 100 minutes time-span. I'd give it 8 out of 10.


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