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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2006

13 items from 2017


TV Imports: The Best Foreign Netflix Shows to Binge, Part 3

18 August 2017 1:29 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Even though Netflix has started to cancel its underperforming series in earnest, that doesn’t mean it lacks for programming. In fact, its slate of offerings is fuller than ever, which makes it difficult for viewers to choose when faced with an embarrassment of bingeable riches.

Netflix’s foreign series, however, rarely get promotion amidst all of the other American shows that have been produced. Although IndieWire has previously provided handy lists of foreign-language series a couple of times, including other imports, that is only a hint of all offerings available.

Read More:tv Imports: The Best Foreign Netflix Shows to Binge, Part 1

By now, you’ve already seen Brazil’s excellent dystopian series “3%” or the unforgettable “Chewing Gum” starring Michaela Coel, but what’s next? In an effort to continue helping viewers discover new or lesser-known foreign TV shows, we’ve compiled another list of those series worth bingeing below: »

- Hanh Nguyen

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TV Imports: The Best Foreign Netflix Shows to Binge, Part 3

18 August 2017 1:29 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Even though Netflix has started to cancel its underperforming series in earnest, that doesn’t mean it lacks for programming. In fact, its slate of offerings is fuller than ever, which makes it difficult for viewers to choose when faced with an embarrassment of bingeable riches.

Netflix’s foreign series, however, rarely get promotion amidst all of the other American shows that have been produced. Although IndieWire has previously provided handy lists of foreign-language series a couple of times, including other imports, that is only a hint of all offerings available.

Read More:tv Imports: The Best Foreign Netflix Shows to Binge, Part 1

By now, you’ve already seen Brazil’s excellent dystopian series “3%” or the unforgettable “Chewing Gum” starring Michaela Coel, but what’s next? In an effort to continue helping viewers discover new or lesser-known foreign TV shows, we’ve compiled another list of those series worth bingeing below: »

- Hanh Nguyen

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Kingdom Series Finale Recap and Appreciation: Tapped Out

2 August 2017 9:00 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

To the very end, Kingdom never pulled its punches. It was a drama populated by terribly faulted people, nary a perfect role model among them. And the closest thing that the Kulinas’ inner circle had to one died in the penultimate episode, no casualty of a brutal cage fight but an utterly random shooting.

RelatedKingdom Cancelled After Three Seasons

What’s more, Kingdom had an incredible sense of place and culture, breaking away from TV’s myriad crime, medical and superhero shows to take us to a tactile, seldom-explored Venice Beach, liberally shooting on location to put on display no glittery, »

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New Posters Hit For The Punisher & The Defenders — To Be Available At San Diego Comic-Con!

14 July 2017 8:45 AM, PDT | LRMonline.com | See recent LRM Online news »

Marvel is not only dominating the film-sphere this year, but it’s also making a habit of taking over Netflix for at least a weekend for each of their TV shows. The grand tradition started back in 2015 with Daredevil, and continued on with the likes of Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and Iron Fist. This year is especially notable because it won’t feature just two seasons of content — as Marvel and Netflix have done in the past — but Three seasons.

Of course, we’ve already seen the lukewarm Iron Fist hit the small screen, but we still have two heavy-hitters on the way. The first is The Defenders, a team-up limited series that will feature the previously-mentioned supers unite to take on a much bigger foe in New York City. Perhaps the more interesting series, however, will come in the form of The Punisher. Jon Bernthal’s take on the »

- Joseph Medina

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Better Call Saul season 3 episode 10 review: Lantern

20 June 2017 7:51 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Gabriel Bergmoser Jun 20, 2017

Major spoilers in our review of Better Call Saul's season 3 finale...

This review contains spoilers.

See related  Steven Spielberg's Duel: An Appreciation Top 10 Simon Pegg film and TV roles Zak Penn interview: Atari: Game Over, Ready Player One

3.10 Lantern

The big, obvious question at the heart of Better Call Saul, one baked into its premise and indeed, its title, is what made morally flexible but kind hearted Jimmy McGill transform into the ruthless, unscrupulous Saul Goodman. Of course, asking this question demands a certain familiarity with the series that preceded this one, but considering the show is named after an alter ego who has only just appeared in Better Call Saul’s primary timeline but is prominent throughout Breaking Bad it’s safe to say that familiarity can be assumed. And it’s that familiarity that has meant, from day one, there has been a Sword of Damocles hanging over Chuck McGill. From the very first episode it was speculated that Chuck would die and that his death would be part of what pushed Jimmy to become Saul. Three seasons in that very much seems to be the case, although we’ll have to wait another year to know for sure.

This season has been replete with big steps from Jimmy towards who he will inevitably become, and last week’s episode seemed like a new low as Jimmy emotionally manipulated an old woman to make himself rich. What’s curious is that so much of tonight’s episode seems to be a return from that assumed point of no return, as Jimmy sets to work making amends. Kim’s accident, an accident he feels responsible for, has thrown things into stark perspective and so Jimmy comes running back from the brink, determined to recognise his mistakes and make things better. He even tries to make peace with Chuck, only for another devastating scene of brotherly animosity to ensue. Chuck insists that Jimmy, even if his heart is in the right place, will never change, will only continue to keep hurting people. He leaves Jimmy with the horrible sentiment ‘you just don’t matter that much to me’ but rather than take this as a trigger for more moral decay or acts of spiteful revenge, Jimmy sets about trying to prove Chuck wrong. And succeeds; Kim tells him to play to his strengths and so he does, destroying his reputation in the eyes of his elderly former clients in order to right the wrong he committed last week.

Honestly, it would feel like a huge act of back peddling on the part of the writers if it wasn’t for the final scene of the episode.

What has always been fascinating about the relationship between the McGill brothers is how neither is necessarily wrong about the other. At the risk of being slightly reductive, Chuck does the right thing for the wrong reasons while Jimmy is the opposite, however, tragically, Chuck is incorrect about Jimmy in one crucial way. He can and will change; it just won’t be for the better. And furthermore, Chuck may well have given Jimmy his biggest push yet.

But to suggest that Chuck’s suicide (more on this shortly) makes Jimmy become Saul is tantamount to suggesting that Jimmy’s actions led to Chuck’s death or that he was responsible for Kim’s accident. There is a grain of truth in the thought, but as Kim says tonight ‘I’m an adult and I made a choice’. Ultimately, we can’t blame others for the choices we make. People influence us, sure, but the decision to act always rests with us. It’s just hard to imagine Jimmy seeing things that way when he learns what happened to his brother.

Which is… what, exactly? Frustratingly the episode leaves Chuck’s fate up in the air, but from a storytelling perspective it’s hard to see this as anything other than the death of the character. If Chuck lives Jimmy will feel bad, but the chance to make amends remains. That needs to be taken away for him to sink lower again, especially after tonight’s concentrated effort to redeem himself. Furthermore, the episode just feels like a swansong for the character. We get a glimpse of Chuck reading to Jimmy as a kid, by the light of a gas lamp that takes on grim significance on a second viewing, before seeing Chuck confidently working the room at Hhm, his victory assured, prior to the rug being pulled out from under him out from under him and his complete unravelling.

Chuck, ultimately, needed to win. He was never a character who could accept defeat and his apparent decision to move on from trying to destroy Jimmy after his courtroom humiliation was an enormous moment for the character. But with that choice came his determination to focus on his career and improve his health, neither of which went the way he planned. His recovery, while present, was slow, and his obsession with defeating his brother made him unreliable and unstable in the eyes of his colleagues. Last week made it clear that Chuck was bluffing when he threatened Hhm; more a sign of his desperation than anything else, and this week Howard called that bluff by paying Chuck millions out of his own pocket in order to save the company from both a volatile element and financial ruin.

For Chuck, this was a crushing blow. Not only was he unable to manoeuvre his way out of it, but the cheque was filled out and the staff gathered to farewell him before he even made his case in that boardroom. His humiliation and defeat was complete. And while Lantern did a lot to make us feel for Chuck, it is unquestionable that his own actions brought him to this moment.

In the centrepiece of the episode Chuck’s desperate façade finally crumbles as, despite shutting off all the electricity in the house, the meter just keeps going. As increasingly ominous music grows Chuck literally tears his house apart trying to remove the electricity sources that are tormenting him; a torment he now knows is not real. Finally, sweaty, desperate and worn out he seems to find the wires he is looking for only for the meter to keep going. Cue a collision of meter and baseball bat. It’s Chuck as we’ve never seen him before; in his worst moments there was always some modicum of control, a vestige of a plan he was still enacting. But all that is gone. Chuck has nothing left except the illness that provided his brother with the ammunition to destroy him, and he burned his last bridge when Jimmy came to make amends. Chuck needed control and that control was wrested away from him in increments throughout this season as every last inch of his power was eroded. Tearing his house apart in a futile attempt to make things the way he needs them to be is basically Chuck’s entire story in microcosm and its outcome, like so much on this show, is both tragic and inevitable.

Other things did happen in Lantern, although Chuck’s story does tend to dominate the thoughts as the credits roll. It’s almost easy to forget that we finally saw the (presumed) crippling of Hector Salamanca, as Nacho’s seemingly failed scheme in fact worked, in the process putting him squarely in the sights of someone who has his own reasons for wanting Hector dead. Nacho either just made an enemy or an ally, although considering he’s nowhere to be seen when Breaking Bad begins it’s hard to imagine either state of affairs will bode well for him. And while we will doubtless see Hector again, albeit in his more iconic wheelchair bound state, it will be a shame to say goodbye to this iteration of the character. Hector has been a formidable, detestable villain and it was a welcome surprise that he managed to be just as effective while active as when mute and in a wheelchair.

Meanwhile things have not fallen apart for Kim yet; neither client seems to hold her crash against her and, like Jimmy, what she went through has put things in perspective. It’s actually something of a relief to see her get the chance to relax, even if it’s a little jarring when it’s implied that she knew about Jimmy’s scheme with Mrs Landry. It doesn’t feel like the show has yet brought Kim to a place where she could be okay with what Jimmy did last week, unless I missed something and Jimmy only told her part of the truth. Whatever the case, it was a little confusing and a misstep for what has otherwise been a phenomenal season. I had expected Kim and Jimmy to break up by the end of this run, but I’m glad that wasn’t how it panned out. Kim, for now, is in one piece and probably thinking more clearly than she has in a while. Despite losing the office, we left Kim and Jimmy in a surprisingly good place at the end of this season, in both their personal situations and their relationship.

But, of course, that final scene changed the entire preceding episode and in light of that it’s hard to see Jimmy’s feint towards redemption as anything other than the last gasp of a dying conscience. A whole new set of circumstances is about to land on him, along with guilt that will almost certainly destroy the still resilient soul of Jimmy McGill.

While never quite hitting the tremendous heights of season two, this year has been another home run for Better Call Saul, advancing the plot in leaps and bounds, deepening characters, drawing the mythology closer to that of Breaking Bad and continuing to boast writing, directing and acting in the top tier of what television is offering right now. For my money we’re well past the point where Better Call Saul has anything to prove when it comes to comparisons to its predecessor, and yet it keeps proving its quality and then some. At the time of writing season four is yet to be confirmed, but it’s difficult to imagine a world where this is the end of the story. There’s just still so much left to explore, develop, and conclude.

Assuming the next chapter arrives in a year, a year is once again seeming like a very long wait. Thanks as always for reading along; getting to examine and analyse this phenomenal show is something it’s hard not to feel very lucky about.

See you next year. Hopefully. 

Read Gabriel's review of the previous episode, Fall, here. »

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Omari Hardwick Reflects On Three Seasons Of ‘Power’

25 May 2017 9:06 AM, PDT | AwardsDaily.com | See recent AwardsDaily news »

Omari Hardwick returns next month in Starz’s Power. He discusses how this was the show for him and what it’s like to work with Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson. You started off in athletics. »

- Jazz Tangcay

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Zach Woods Compares His ‘Silicon Valley’ Character to a ‘New England Mom,’ and Here’s Why That’s Hysterically Tragic

19 April 2017 10:01 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Think of your standard YouTube character tribute videos. Three seasons of a show like “Silicon Valley” usually get you some classic one-liners, memorable character beats and a few outtakes for good measure, all wrapped up in a few minutes.

This one for Jared, Zach Woods’ character on HBO’s “Silicon Valley,” runs the length of an entire episode of the show.

Jared has always been at the center of the “Silicon Valley” story (there he is on the Season 1 poster, in full Steve Jobs pose, literally at the side of Pied Piper co-founder Richard Hendricks), but Woods has grown to be the show’s heart too. In a world of backstabbing and self-interest, Jared has remained the show’s sole, true altruist.

“I sometimes think of it as an archetypical family,” Woods said. “Erlich is the rambunctious father, Kumail is the baby boy, Gilfoyle is the cat and Richard is like the favorite son. »

- Steve Greene

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Zach Woods Compares His ‘Silicon Valley’ Character to a ‘New England Mom,’ and Here’s Why That’s Hysterically Tragic

19 April 2017 10:01 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Think of your standard YouTube character tribute videos. Three seasons of a show like “Silicon Valley” usually get you some classic one-liners, memorable character beats and a few outtakes for good measure, all wrapped up in a few minutes.

This one for Jared, Zach Woods’ character on HBO’s “Silicon Valley,” runs the length of an entire episode of the show.

Jared has always been at the center of the “Silicon Valley” story (there he is on the Season 1 poster, in full Steve Jobs pose, literally at the side of Pied Piper co-founder Richard Hendricks), but Woods has grown to be the show’s heart too. In a world of backstabbing and self-interest, Jared has remained the show’s sole, true altruist.

“I sometimes think of it as an archetypical family,” Woods said. “Erlich is the rambunctious father, Kumail is the baby boy, Gilfoyle is the cat and Richard is like the favorite son. »

- Steve Greene

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Carrie Coon on What She’s Learned From ‘The Leftovers’ and Moving on to ‘Fargo’

5 April 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Unreadable. That word comes up frequently when producers talk about why they cast Carrie Coon: Onscreen, it’s hard to know what her characters are thinking.

That enigmatic quality has landed her two prominent roles this month — returning for the final season of HBO’s “The Leftovers” (premiering April 16) and starring in the third iteration of FX’s “Fargo” (April 19) as police chief Gloria Burgle, the latest in the series’ famed canon of female sheriffs.

But in person, Coon, 36, is anything but inscrutable. Warm, funny, and charmingly down-to-earth, she’s as stunned by her TV moment as anyone.

“I love Nora Durst so much, and she’s such a hard person to live up to,” she says of her character in “The Leftovers,” over midafternoon tea at the Culver Hotel in Los Angeles, on a rare, welcome escape from the “epically cold” set of “Fargo” in Calgary. “So the fact that I got to move on »

- Debra Birnbaum

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Girl Meets World Remains in Limbo: TVLine Debates, Should It Be Saved?

27 January 2017 2:18 PM, PST | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

It’s been exactly one week since Girl Meets World aired its (makeshift) series finale, and fans of the former Disney Channel series remain glued to social media, hoping for an 11th hour save from another network or streaming service.

RelatedPost Mortem: Girl Meets World Boss Breaks Down Series Finale Surprises, Reveals a Feeny/Eric Moment You Didn’t See

The odds aren’t looking terrific at the moment — Netflix has confirmed it has no intentions of saving it, while a Hulu pick-up also seems unlikely — but much like the show itself, there’s always hope. Below, lifelong »

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Justice League Of America: Killer Frost Rebirth #1 Review

25 January 2017 9:15 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

This review contains minor spoilers.

DC’s Rebirth event is heading towards its second year, and one of the most exciting prospects is Steve Orlando’s Justice League of America. In the buildup to this hotly-anticipated comic, the company has been releasing a stream of Rebirth one-shots, featuring different members of Orlando’s unusual team. This time round, it’s Killer Frost’s turn!

The issue spins out of the Justice League vs. Suicide Squad event, which sees Killer Frost save the Justice League – and the world – from Max Lord. In doing so, she earns the Justice League’s admiration, and Batman vouches for her to join his newest iteration of the League. But it’s not going to be an easy journey for Killer Frost; Amanda Waller doesn’t take kindly to losing one of her pawns, and Waller launches a ruthless game to break Caitlin Snow down.

Of course, »

- Tom Bacon

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Man Seeking Woman Season 3 Review

5 January 2017 2:28 PM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Two episodes were provided prior to broadcast.

Three seasons in and it’s still hard to explain the soaring achievements that Fxx’s Man Seeking Woman accomplishes in each episode (sometimes multiple times an episode; sometimes multiple times in one joke). The show’s silly shtick is very much intact in the just-launched third season, but creator Simon Rich takes an interesting detour this time around into more linear storytelling.

No longer is each episode completely disconnected from the previous, as the show takes us on the continued journey of the giddy new romance between dictionary definition of millennial slacker Josh (Jay Baruchel) and the show’s newest addition, Lucy (Katie Findlay). Man Seeking Woman is still purely and endearingly Man Seeking Woman everywhere else, thank the TV gods. With new gags, running jokes and more surreal sequences than you can shake a bottle of ranch dressing at, all of »

- Mitchel Broussard

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‘Girl Meets World’ Canceled After Three Seasons

5 January 2017 12:49 PM, PST | Uinterview | See recent Uinterview news »

Disney’s spinoff from their 90s and 00s show Boy Meets World, Girl Meets World is ending after three seasons. Girl Meets World Ending After Three Seasons The official announcement came just hours before the show received a PGA Awards nomination for Outstanding Children’s Program. Boy Meets World was a much loved kids and teens show for millennials, but […]

  Source: uInterview

The post ‘Girl Meets World’ Canceled After Three Seasons appeared first on uInterview. »

- Hillary Luehring-Jones

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2006

13 items from 2017


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