Play for Today (1970–1984)
7.9/10
62
5 user 1 critic

Sunset Across the Bay 

A married couple, after a life time of work and bringing up a family, retire and awaken to the fast changing world around them, the habitual nature of their relationship, and what they have left.

Director:

Writer:

(by)
Reviews
Edit

Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
Mam
Harry Markham ...
Dad
...
Bertram
Christine Buckley ...
Woman in flats
Bill Pilkington ...
Woman's husband
...
Canteen Lady
...
Gatekeeper
...
Removal Man
...
Workman
Albert Modley ...
Arthur
...
Mrs Longstaff
Marjorie Sudell ...
Newsagent
Clifford Kershaw ...
1st Man in teabar
Joe Kenyon ...
2nd Man in teabar
...
Milkman
Edit

Storyline

A married couple, after a life time of work and bringing up a family, retire and awaken to the fast changing world around them, the habitual nature of their relationship, and what they have left.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

20 February 1975 (UK)  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Featured in Alan Bennett at 80: Bennett Meets Hytner (2014) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
deceptively simple play
5 September 2009 | by See all my reviews

Alan Bennett's play 'Sunset Across The Bay' looks simple on the surface: a character study of a long marriage which has settled into routine, where the wife has been a housewife and the husband a worker in engineering.

From the Leeds slums where they live - about to be demolished - to the seaside retirement flat at Morecambe, we see the old couple struggle to adjust to spending time together after a life where every day was the same.

As 'Dad' says, he's worked all his life to do nothing, and it's difficult for him to adjust.

Quietly simplistic but complex as well, 'Sunset Across The Bay' is a beautiful piece of work, and everything that drama produced today would not be. There's no great action sequences, no sex, violence, or swearing, no hand-held filming. It's completely believable and ordinary, and yet, this being Bennett, it is extraordinary as well.

The kind of thing the BBC did best in the days where they produced many plays each year: and the kind of thing which is sadly missed.


5 of 5 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 5 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

'La La Land' Producer on the Art of Espionage

Jordan Horowitz shares some "secret" information about his new spy-thriller series, "Counterpart." Plus, Kevin Smith reveals his favorite Sundance movies of all time.

Watch now