3.8/10
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3 user 1 critic

Samurai (1945)

A young Japanese-American orphan in California is taken in by a priest who is actually a Japanese secret agent and a samurai warrior. Due to the samurai's training, the boy murders his ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
Paul Fung ...
Luke Chan ...
David Chow ...
Japanese Secret Service Man
Barbara Woodell ...
Mrs. Morey
Fred C. Bond ...
Mr. Morey
Larry Moore ...
Frank Morey
Ronald Siu ...
Beal Wong ...
Engineer
Joseph Kim ...
Engineer
Sung Li ...
Gen. Sugiama (as Sung Lee)
Frances Chan ...
Chinese Girl Prisoner
Mary Ellen Butler ...
White Girl Prisoner
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Storyline

A young Japanese-American orphan in California is taken in by a priest who is actually a Japanese secret agent and a samurai warrior. Due to the samurai's training, the boy murders his English teacher, kills the American parents who have adopted him, smuggles Japanese secret plans into the country, and eventually becomes the governor of California with plans to infiltrate Japanese spies into the state so they can take over. Written by Anonymous

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A PLOT SO FANTASTIC NO ONE DARED BELIEVE IT! (original poster - all caps) See more »

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Drama | War

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Release Date:

24 August 1945 (USA)  »

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Although many of the characters are supposed to be Japanese, there was not a single Japanese person in the cast--the Asian actors playing Japanese were Chinese and Korean. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Sham Awry
7 July 2003 | by (Proctorville, Ohio) – See all my reviews

This rockbottom-budgeted feature supposes that the samurai-spawning religion of Bushido is as natural to the Japanese as killing gazelles is to lions--with about the same results! The protagonist, a war orphan adopted by white Californians, hears the blood-call in the suasions of a zombie-like Shinto priest. The pretty, Americanized little boy is inexplicably sent to Europe (to study medicine and art) and returns craggy-countenanced, with a thickened accent and Japanese manners. Stereotypically squint-eyed and toothy, he reunites with his mentor, and the duo leer vampirishly over the prospect of planet-wide domination. With all the panache of a grade-school production, much of the movie is composed of docudramatic narration, apparently as a money-saving measure and to assure the buy-war-bonds message emerges from the slapsticky silliness of squawking Nipponese bureaucrats and sword-slashing pseudo-samurai. As a historical piece, the film is a thorn among thorns (that will prick the funnybone of many!)and is, of course, of interest as a particularly odious example of wartime propaganda.


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