A French Canadian boy endures the terrible shame when he receives the hockey sweater of the wrong team.

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Won 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Roch Carrier ...
Narrator (voice)
Jean-Guy Moreau ...
Hockey Commentary (voice)
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Storyline

This cartoon tells a humourous story that underlines the "two solitudes" element of Canadian society where two social groups, the English speaking and French speaking populations live in the same country, but can literally barely speak to or tolerate each other. This is illustrated in this story about how a boy in Quebec has to endure the terrible shame of being given the sweater of the predominate English speaking Canadian hockey team, Toronto Maple Leafs, instead of the same sweater of his idol, Maurice "Rocket" Richard of the Montreal Canadiens. Written by Kenneth Chisholm <kchishol@execulink.com>

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Release Date:

17 October 1984 (Denmark)  »

Also Known As:

Le chandail  »

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Did You Know?

Goofs

The iconic photo on the narrator's wall was from the Stanley Cup-winning goal in 1953, even though the story was set in 1946. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: When I was a boy growing up in a small village in Quebec, two events were mandatory: the mass on Sunday, and the Saturday night hockey game.
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Connections

Edited into 50 for 50: Volume 1, Tape 4: Children's Choice (1989) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Not Much Humor, But Tons Of Truth As Die-Hard Sports Fans Will Tell You
13 July 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Well, I have to disagree with Leonard Maltin on this animated short. He loves it and claimed it was hilarious. I enjoyed it but didn't see any humor. He doesn't even like hockey or know anything about it, and still loved the story. Living right across the border from Canada, I have watched hockey for 50 years both there and in Buffalo....but I didn't think much of this cartoon. Oh, it was interesting and I know what would happen if you wore a Toronto jersey up in the Quebec area - disaster! That especially holds true in the glory years of Les Canadians. However, that doesn't make the story funny.

Back in the 1950s, everyone in the Quebec provinces idolized the Montreal Canadians and their star player, Maurice Richard, and everyone wanted to be like him. When his mother orders a new sweater, it has the Toronto Maple Leafs emblem on it, so the kid doesn't want to be caught dead wearing it.. When he finally does and heads to the local rink, he gets ostracized from the rest of his hockey buddies. What's so funny about that? I could see the same thing happening to a kid in Boston who is Red Sox die-hard and his mom gets him Yankees shirt! Horrors! You couldn't wear it, and vice-versa.

Maybe to someone who doesn't follow sports at all, like Maltin, this situation seems odd and humorous to him...but it's a fact of life or any bit-time sports fan and his favorite team. It was an interesting story, and totally believable, but nothing that made me laugh.

The art was fun to look at throughout, almost like looking at a long series of crayon paintings done by a talented school kid. The French Canadian accent was good, too. This movie was part of the DVD "Leonard Maltin's Animation Favorites From The National Film Board Of Canada.


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