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The Restless Spirit (1913)

The Dreamer is unhappy with his marriage and runs away. He collapses and is found by The Desert Flower, who convince him to return to his family. In various illusions he sees himself in ... See full summary »

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(poem),
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Cast

Cast overview:
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The Husband - the Restless Spirit
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The Wife
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The Desert Flower
William Worthington ...
The Stranger
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The Wife's Father
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Storyline

The Dreamer is unhappy with his marriage and runs away. He collapses and is found by The Desert Flower, who convince him to return to his family. In various illusions he sees himself in three stories. In first is Napoleon. In the second he is a Knight. And in the third a Sultan. But in all the illusions he die. Meanwhile his wife is about to be send into the desert while refusing to remarry a Stranger. Before this could happen, the Dreamer arrives and send the Stranger into the desert. He becomes again a loved and respected member of the Town. Written by Anonymous

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based on poem | See All (1) »

Genres:

Short | Drama

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Details

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Release Date:

27 October 1913 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Paths of Glory  »

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Trivia

The film is lost as no copy of it is known to exist. See more »

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User Reviews

The production is very elaborate
9 December 2017 | by See all my reviews

This is a three-reel drama, "suggested by Gray's Elegy," as appears in the postscript to the title, and this classic poem supplies many of the sub-titles. Mr. Kerrigan plays the lead, that of the dreamer who meets a friend in time to prevent him from attempting to realize his dreams at the cost of his wife's and child's happiness. He dreams of many careers, that of musician, statesman, warrior, captain of finance. He is turned from his dreams by the argument contained in Gray's verses, "that the paths of glory lead but to the grave." The friend who convinces him of this truth is a girl with a past, whom he meets in a desert after a narrow escape from death by thirst. The production is very elaborate, containing a number of very picturesque settings to illustrate the lines quoted from the Elegy. The drama was apparently written with an eye for these scenes, and they are the most meritorious part of the play. The story is none too strong. - The Moving Picture World, October 25, 1913


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