IMDb > Zapruder Film of Kennedy Assassination (1963)
Zapruder Film of Kennedy Assassination
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Zapruder Film of Kennedy Assassination (1963) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

User Rating:
7.9/10   1,625 votes »
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Plot:
The home movie footage that caught the assassination of the American President, John F. Kennedy. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
1 win See more »
User Reviews:
A grisly slice of history See more (15 total) »

Cast

 
Charles Brehm ... Himself (onlooker, with son)
Howard Brennan ... Himself (onlooker)
John Connally ... Himself
Nellie Connally ... Herself
William Greer ... Himself (driver)
Bobby Hargis ... Himself (policeman, on motorcycle)
George W. Hickey ... Himself (in following limousine, in back seat) (unconfirmed)

Clint Hill ... Himself
Jean Hill ... Herself (onlooker, in red coat)
Roy Kellerman ... Himself (beside Greer)

Jacqueline Kennedy ... Herself

John F. Kennedy ... Himself
Samuel A. Kinney ... Himself (driver, in following limousine)
Paul E. Landis ... Himself (in following limousine, behind Ready) (only in extended frame version)
B.J. Martin ... Himself (policeman, on motorcycle)
Tim McIntyre ... Himself (in following limousine, behind Hill)
Mary Moorman ... Herself (onlooker, in dark coat)
Kenneth P. O'Donnell ... Himself (passenger, in following limousine) (only in extended frame version) (unconfirmed)
David F. Powers ... Himself (passenger, in following limousine) (only in extended frame version)
John D. Ready ... Himself (in following limousine, on running board) (only in extended frame version)
Emory P. Roberts ... Himself (radioman, in following limousine)
Phillip L. Willis ... Himself (onlooker, steps off street)
Rosemary Willis ... Herself (onlooker, in white sweatshirt, runs alongside)
Louis Steven Witt ... Himself (onlooker, with open umbrella, behind freeway sign)
Ralph Yarborough ... Himself (passenger, in vice-presidential limousine) (unconfirmed)

Directed by
Abraham Zapruder 
 
Cinematography by
Abraham Zapruder 
 

Distributors

Additional Details

Runtime:
1 min
Country:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The camera that Abraham Zapruder used in the filming was a mechanical, spring-wound, 8-millimeter Bell & Howell Model 414PD Zoomatic Director, with a Varamat 9-27mm f1.8 zoom lens, set for full close-up. The film was Kodachrome II color stock running at 18.3 frames per second. The footage runs for 26 seconds, which is remarkable because each winding of the camera's mainspring lasts only 30 seconds.See more »
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FAQ

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9 out of 9 people found the following review useful.
A grisly slice of history, 17 April 2007
Author: ackstasis from Australia

It's the magic of the motion picture. Film has given us the ability to enjoy the memorable performances of actors and actresses long gone, to experience the culture of another era and, indeed, to relive pivotal moments in history over and over again, whether we wish to or not. The assassination of US President John F. Kennedy at 12:30 PM (Central Standard Time) on Friday, November 22, 1963, in Dallas, Texas was a horrific moment in American history. For decades, endless debate has raged over the true circumstances of his death, spawning countless conspiracy theories and accusations of a CIA cover-up.

There are films and still photographs taken by at least fourteen photographers in Dealey Plaza during the assassination. Of these, the footage recorded by private citizen Abraham Zapruder is the most complete visual recording of the incident. I'm not one to subscribe to these often-ridiculous conspiracy theories, so now I'll just present the facts: Zapruder captured the scene with a Model 414 PD Bell and Howell Zoomatic Director Series Camera that operated via a spring-wound mechanism, which filmed at an average frame rate of 18.3 frames per second, and recorded on Kodak Kodachrome II 8 mm movie safety film. The footage of the assassination itself runs for a total of 486 frames, or 26.6 seconds. Kennedy's limousine is visible in 343 of the frames, or 18.7 seconds.

The most infamous image contained in the film is the final fatal shot to President Kennedy's head, almost exactly as the limousine passes directly in front of (and slightly below) Zapruder's position. It is truly a horrid thing to be watching, but sheer morbid human curiosity makes us simply incapable of averting our gaze. Pleasant this film is not, but its significance to American history is irrefutable.

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Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Zapruder Film of Kennedy Assassination (1963)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Other film footage? The Colourful Jester
An amateurish effort krichter-4
BLU RAY VERSION??? alex_pavlovic001
can you get this on laserdisc? fryar229
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