Mastercard Masters of Music Concert for the Prince's Trust (1996)

TV Special  -   -  Documentary | Music
8.8
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This benefit performance includes a staging of Quadrophenia, a rock opera by Pete Townshend based on the British gang conflicts of the 1960's.

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Title: Mastercard Masters of Music Concert for the Prince's Trust (1996– )

Mastercard Masters of Music Concert for the Prince's Trust (1996– ) on IMDb 8.8/10

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Cast

Credited cast:
...
Himself
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Himself / Jimmy
...
Himself
...
Himself
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Herself - Vocals
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Himself
Zak Starkey ...
Himself - Drums
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Ace Face / Bellboy
Gary Glitter ...
GodFather
David Gilmour ...
Himself
...
Himself
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Bucky Baxter ...
Himself
John Bundrick ...
Himself - Musician
Jon Carin ...
Himself - Musician
Tony Garnier ...
Himself
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This benefit performance includes a staging of Quadrophenia, a rock opera by Pete Townshend based on the British gang conflicts of the 1960's.

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Genres:

Documentary | Music

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14 July 1996 (USA)  »

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Connections

Follows The Prince's Trust Rock Gala: 10th Birthday (1986) See more »

Soundtracks

Silvio
Performed by Bob Dylan
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User Reviews

 
Dylan and Quadrophenia are outstanding.
10 May 1999 | by (Marietta, GA, USA) – See all my reviews

My take on the music and musicians seen here:

1. Alanis Morrissette- Considerably younger than the other "classic" artists on the bill, but undeniably talented. Even some of us older fans can enjoy her. It remains to be seen if she'll have enough diversity in her style to sustain her early enormous popularity over a full career. (Presently her second album isn't quite making the noise the first one did.)

2. Bob Dylan- He continues to amaze his fans with his musical vitality after over 35 years of professionally performing. He constantly reinvents his old music and chooses freely and abundantly from his enormous repertoire, which just so happens to be the best of any living songwriter. Still, many will dismiss him saying, "I don't like his voice." His usual band of the time (John Jackson, Tony Garnier, Winston Watson, Bucky Baxter) is here augmented by Ron Wood and Al Kooper. All songs are performed well; I especially liked "Leopard Skin Pillbox Hat" and "Silvio."

3. Quadrophenia- This wasn't billed as a performance by the Who despite the participation of Messers. Daltrey, Entwistle and Townshend. This semi-theatrical presentation sounded amazingly fresh, a bit of a surprise to me. Townshend took it easy as he's done in more recent years, playing acoustic guitar, but his solo turn was warmly appreciated. Entwistle was as dexerous as ever. Daltrey was in fine voice throughout. At one point near the end with his head bowed he looked about 25 years old.

4. Eric Clapton- It pains me to say it, but Eric has hardly done anything that has interested me since Derek & the Dominos. Even now that he's playing more blues and displaying more virtuosity, it just seems like an empty use of his talent. He tosses out a million notes on "Have You Ever Loved a Woman" but he's done that song better countless times in the past. The audience goes crazy over "Badge," not noticing or caring what an ordinary, mediocre song it is.


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