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That Was the Week That Was (TV Series 1962–1963) - Plot Summary Poster

Plot Summary

  • Originally proposed to the BBC under the title "Saturday Night," this late-night satirical review of current events built a huge audience, going from 3.5 million viewers on its opening (November 24, 1962) to ten million by end of its first season (April 1963). The most famous "TW3" sketch, "What Is a Mum?" (aka "Mother's Day"), was written by Dennis Potter and David Nathan from an idea by Jack Rosenthal. Using a format introduced on Jackie Gleason's recordings ("What Is a Boy?", "What Is a Girl?"), popular during the 1950s and also satirized by Steve Allen ("What Is a Freem?"), "What Is a Mum?" depicted a housewife in terms of ad slogans: "She thinks every washday is a miracle. And since she adds the extra egg to everything except the bacon, she is probably constipated as well." Other Potter-Nathan sketches satirized Tories, predictions in the "Sunday Express," Q&A with a spokesman for the South African government, Adam Faith songs, and Hugh Carleton Greene. The American "TW3" (introduced in a November 1963 special) never equaled the stunning success scored by the original British "TW3."

    - Written by Bhob Stewart <bhob2@aol.com>
  • Originally proposed to the BBC under the title "Saturday Night", this late-night satirical review of current events built a huge audience, going from 3.5 million viewers on its opening (November 24, 1962) to ten million by end of its first season (April 1963). The most famous "TW3" sketch, "What Is a Mum?" (aka "Mother's Day"), was written by Dennis Potter and David Nathan from an idea by 'Jack Rosenthal'. Using a format introduced on Jackie Gleason's recordings ("What Is a Boy?", "What Is a Girl?"), popular during the 1950s and also satirised by Steve Allen ("What Is a Freem?"), "What Is a Mum?" depicted a housewife in terms of ad slogans: "She thinks every washday is a miracle. And since she adds the extra egg to everything except the bacon, she is probably constipated as well." Other Dennis Potter-David Nathan sketches satirised Tories, predictions in the "Sunday Express", Q&A with a spokesman for the South African government, Adam Faith songs, and Hugh Carleton Greene. The American "TW3" (introduced in a November 1963 special) never equaled the stunning success scored by the original British "TW3".

    - Written by Bhob Stewart <bhob2@aol.com>
  • Satirical sketch show. The first such show in the UK. It ran for two seasons before being pulled just before the 1964 general election.

    - Written by Steve Crook <steve@brainstorm.co.uk>

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