6.0/10
34
3 user 1 critic

Dark Enemy (1984)

| Drama, Horror, Mystery
After a nuclear war, a group of children at an isolated farmhouse debate what the outside world might be like. Soon one of them leaves the house to investigate, and finds out that things aren't the way they thought.

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Ash
Douglas Storm ...
Ezra
Martin Laing ...
Barnaby
Chris Chescoe ...
Garth
...
Ruth
Helen Mason ...
Rosemary
Rory Macfarquhar ...
Aron
Cerian Van Doorninck ...
Beth
James Guest ...
Tod
Isobel Mason ...
Hazle
Oliver Hicks ...
Jay
Bethan Van Doorninck ...
Dill
James Mills ...
Midge
Philip Dragoumis ...
Frog
Mark Wallace ...
Grub
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Storyline

After a nuclear war, a group of children at an isolated farmhouse debate what the outside world might be like. Soon one of them leaves the house to investigate, and finds out that things aren't the way they thought.

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Drama | Horror | Mystery

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Not worth the bother
4 April 2013 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

How can this film be a low budget British gem? It ain't. As the late John Brosnan would say, the message in a film like this is the usual old one - science and technology are evil, and nature is good. Or, as the late John Brosnan would put it again, there are those who think that if you add the sci-fi elements to a movie like this, it automatically becomes a science fiction movie. Because I am afraid that is just about all that sums up a film like this, especially as it has loads and loads of holes. For a start, who is the Great Spirit supposed to be? Is the Great Spirit God, Mother Nature, Mother Earth? The audience is simply not told. What's more, why were there brand new wind turbines in the valley? Who put them there? And before Aron makes the journey to the edges of the valley, we are told that others have done this already. Well what happened to them? Did they settle out beyond the edges of the valley and never come back? Or did they come back and tell everybody what they had seen? If that is the case, why was not their observations passed down to future generations? Even more annoying is this - when Aron gets to the edges of the valley, he sees fields, a house with smoke coming out of the chimney and sheep in the fields. Surely he should be seeing a ruined nuclear burnt landscape - but he doesn't. Or is he seeing ghosts from the past? Not only that, others who double cross Aron and go beyond the edges themselves come back and claim they have met and spoken to other people beyond the valley edges! Well, how come Aron didn't meet them? As John Brosnan would put it - it simply does not pay to ask. Because writer Colin Finbow just simply abandons all explanations for an all out attack on human greed and exploitation, which is what the rest of the children succumb to. And there is only one expression to make on all of that - Good God!Honestly, this film simply is not worth watching because it just does not have a proper vision on what it is supposed to be about. Nice countryside around the Welsh valley used, though!


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