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The Case Against the 20% Federal Admissions Tax on Motion Picture Theatres (1953)

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5.4
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Ratings: 5.4/10 from 62 users  
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"The Entire Motion Picture Industry Presents" this film. At the time this film was made, motion picture theaters were required to pay a 20% tax on gross ticket sales, and Congress was ... See full summary »

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Title: The Case Against the 20% Federal Admissions Tax on Motion Picture Theatres (1953)

The Case Against the 20% Federal Admissions Tax on Motion Picture Theatres (1953) on IMDb 5.4/10

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Cast

Uncredited cast:
...
Narrator (voice) (uncredited)
Gordon Bauer ...
Himself (uncredited)
E.R. Baum ...
Himself (uncredited)
James Bell ...
Himself, actor in film clip from 'Dial 1119' (archive footage) (uncredited)
Keefe Brasselle ...
Himself, actor in film clip from 'Dial 1119' (archive footage) (uncredited)
...
Himself, Actor as Bartender in film clip from 'Dial 1119' (archive footage) (uncredited)
Claude Cooper ...
Himself (uncredited)
Virginia Field ...
Herself, actress in film clip from 'Dial 1119' (archive footage) (uncredited)
C.R. Guthrie ...
Himself (uncredited)
Leaman Marshall ...
Himself (uncredited)
Pat McGee ...
Himself (uncredited)
Charles Tannen ...
Narrator (voice) (uncredited)
Avis Waldron ...
Herself (uncredited)
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Storyline

"The Entire Motion Picture Industry Presents" this film. At the time this film was made, motion picture theaters were required to pay a 20% tax on gross ticket sales, and Congress was debating lowering this tax (as well as others) in a bill being considered by a Congressional committee. This film, which was made especially to be shown to members of the committee, sets forth the motion picture industry's case for reducing, if not eliminating, the tax. It presents statistics regarding the closing of theaters in general (approximately 4500 US theaters, or about 25%, from 1946 through 1952), and the number of theaters that have closed in each committee member's state. These closings have caused a steady decline of revenues. Additionally, theater owners in various midwestern cities tell how this tax has adversely affected their businesses. In the small town of Holton, Kansas, merchants state that the closed movie theater was the city's main entertainment center. Without it to draw people ... Written by David Glagovsky <dglagovsky@prodigy.net>

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1.37 : 1
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Begins with "The Entire Motion Picture Industry Presents"... See more »

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References Key Largo (1948) See more »

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User Reviews

An Interesting if Overlong Curio
15 September 2009 | by (Louisville, KY) – See all my reviews

Case Against the 20% Federal Admissions Tax on Motion Picture Theatres, The (1953)

** (out of 4)

The Motion Picture Industry of America produced this document, which was originally meant to be shown to a Congressional committee who were debating on whether or not to lower the 20% tax on admissions. The film tells us about the thousands of theaters being forced to close throughout the country and how this also effects other businesses around them. We also learn that theater owners, due to the bad economy, are losing a lot of money because people just aren't coming to the movies anymore. We even get to hear about how TV is keeping folks away. I had heard some pretty negative things about this 23-minute short but I somewhat enjoyed what we got here. There are several big problems including several people talking about their problems yet reading off of cue cards. This might not be a problem but it's clear a few people are having to read them just to say their name and the name of the theater? The film beats the subject into the ground but that's to be expected. One good thing about this film is how we get to view some old theaters and how they looked back in the day. Seeing the old posters and advertisement was fun and makes the film worth viewing at least once.


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