(1966–1969)

News

Roger Lloyd Pack obituary

Stage and screen actor best known for his roles in Only Fools and Horses, The Vicar of Dibley and Harry Potter

The talented and idiosyncratic character actor Roger Lloyd Pack, who has died of pancreatic cancer aged 69, achieved national recognition, and huge popularity, as Colin "Trigger" Ball, the lugubrious Peckham road sweeper in John Sullivan's brilliantly acted comedy series Only Fools and Horses. He appeared alongside David Jason's Del Boy and Nicholas Lyndhurst's "plonker" Rodney from 1981 for 10 years, with many a seasonal "special" for another decade.

This success cemented a career in which, up to that point, he had played important roles at the Royal Shakespeare Company, the National Theatre and the Almeida theatre in north London – he was a notably anguished Rosmer in Ibsen's Rosmersholm at the National in 1987, opposite Suzanne Bertish – without recognition any wider than usually appreciative reviews.

His enhanced status led to another
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Roger Lloyd Pack obituary

Stage and screen actor best known for his roles in Only Fools and Horses, The Vicar of Dibley and Harry Potter

The talented and idiosyncratic character actor Roger Lloyd Pack, who has died of pancreatic cancer aged 69, achieved national recognition, and huge popularity, as Colin "Trigger" Ball, the lugubrious Peckham road sweeper in John Sullivan's brilliantly acted comedy series Only Fools and Horses. He appeared alongside David Jason's Del Boy and Nicholas Lyndhurst's "plonker" Rodney from 1981 for 10 years, with many a seasonal "special" for another decade.

This success cemented a career in which, up to that point, he had played important roles at the Royal Shakespeare Company, the National Theatre and the Almeida theatre in north London – he was a notably anguished Rosmer in Ibsen's Rosmersholm at the National in 1987, opposite Suzanne Bertish – without recognition any wider than usually appreciative reviews.

His enhanced status led to another
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

David Spenser obituary

Child radio star of the 1940s and 50s best remembered for playing Richmal Crompton's Just William

David Spenser, who has died aged 79, was the pre-eminent child radio star of the 1940s and 50s and will be best remembered for his portrayal on air of Just William. The author Richmal Crompton cast him in the role, in a series of dramatisations of her novels about the raucous but endearing 11-year-old outlaw.

This was in 1948, when David turned 14 and was already a seasoned radio actor – performing more than one play a week, he once told me. He had come into acting through a ruse set up by his ambitious mother and a BBC friend: he was lured into Broadcasting House and found himself in a studio being auditioned by the Children's Hour producer Josephine Plummer. For playing the lead in Just William he received the standard juvenile fee of four guineas
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

David Spenser obituary

Child radio star of the 1940s and 50s best remembered for playing Richmal Crompton's Just William

David Spenser, who has died aged 79, was the predominant child radio star of the 1940s and 50s and will be best remembered for his portrayal on air of Just William. The author Richmal Crompton cast him in the role, in a series of dramatisations of her novels about the raucous but endearing 11-year-old outlaw.

This was in 1948, when David turned 14 and was already a seasoned radio actor – performing more than one play a week, he once told me. He had come into acting through a ruse set up by his ambitious mother and a BBC friend: he was lured into Broadcasting House and found himself in a studio being auditioned by the Children's Hour producer Josephine Plummer. For playing the lead in Just William he received the standard juvenile fee of four guineas
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Nicholas Selby obituary

A familiar face on TV and a stage actor at the cutting edge

Nicholas Selby, who has died aged 85, was, in many ways, the archetypal supporting actor: dependable, grave and imposing while emitting a sense of authoritarian decency, courtesy and old school charm. And yet, although he was a familiar face on television, playing majors, judges and elderly peers – and a chief constable in the long-running late-1960s police series Softly Softly – he was linked with radical theatre work at the Royal Court and the Royal Shakespeare Company, where he was one of the earliest associate artists.

Selby was, in fact, an old-fashioned socialist, hailing from a working-class family in Holborn, central London, where his father worked for a rubber company. The family lived above a cinema, where young James (he later changed his name at the behest of Equity), the youngest of three, watched all the new releases free of charge.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Alan Plater dies at 75

Playwright and author of TV dramas including The Beiderbecke Affair and Fortunes of War

Alan Plater, whose TV credits in a writing career spanning 50 years included The Beiderbecke Affair, Fortunes of War and the screenplay for A Very British Coup, has died, his agent confirmed to the BBC today.

Plater, 75, wrote novels and for film and theatre, but will be best remembered for a profilic body of television drama spanning six decades, starting with TV play The Referees for BBC North in 1961.

His final TV drama, Joe Maddison's War, starring Kevin Whately and Robson Green and set on the eve of the second world war in the north-east, where Plater was born, is currently in post-production for ITV.

Plater was born in Jarrow in 1935 and moved with his family as a young child to Hull, where he grew up.

He studied architecture at Newcastle University and worked for a short
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Alan Plater dies at 75

Playwright and author of TV dramas including The Beiderbecke Affair and Fortunes of War

Alan Plater, whose TV credits in a writing career spanning 50 years included The Beiderbecke Affair, Fortunes of War and the screenplay for A Very British Coup, has died, his agent confirmed to the BBC today.

Plater, 75, wrote novels and for film and theatre, but will be best remembered for a profilic body of television drama spanning six decades, starting with TV play The Referees for BBC North in 1961.

His final TV drama, Joe Maddison's War, starring Kevin Whately and Robson Green and set on the eve of the second world war in the north-east, where Plater was born, is currently in post-production for ITV.

Plater was born in Jarrow in 1935 and moved with his family as a young child to Hull, where he grew up.

He studied architecture at Newcastle University and worked for a short
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Alan Plater obituary

Popular northern dramatist for TV, theatre and radio, his works guaranteed humour, heart and humanity

Alan Plater, who has died of cancer aged 75, was one of a handful of writers, including Jack Rosenthal, Dennis Potter and Simon Gray, who truly made a difference on British television in the golden age of comedy, drama series and the single play. Like the other two Alans – Bennett and Bleasdale – his name guaranteed a quality of humour, heart and humanity, usually matched by high standards of acting and production values. And like them, he was definitely "northern".

He wrote 18 episodes of the BBC's pioneering police series Z Cars between 1963 and 1965, and 30 episodes for its sequel, Softly Softly. His gift of writing supple, salty dialogue for working-class characters was similarly displayed in Oh No, It's Selwyn Froggitt (1976-77), a series developed from his own single play and starring Bill Maynard as the inept handyman with the thumbs-up catchphrase "Magic!
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Mark Lawson on Alan Plater: 'Bright, socialist and proudly northern'

Throughout his long and varied career the TV writer helped maintain high standards across the industry

Alan Plater, who has died of cancer, was a notably versatile writer. Frequently employed on police series, his career spanned pioneering episodes of Z Cars and Softly Softly to an episode of ITV's Lewis screened in the final months of his life.

This was appropriate because, as well as being one of British TV's key dramatists, he also operated for five decades as a sort of drama cop.

As president of the Writers' Guild and a willing media pundit, Plater policed the schedules and statements of broadcasting executives, as well as the opportunities and conditions for fellow scriptwriters.

He kept the tone and behaviour of the industry higher than it might otherwise have been. Plater refused to accept that multi-channel television and the popularity of Simon Cowell's dancing dogs made it necessary to
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

British Actor Rigby Dead

  • WENN
British actor Terence Rigby has died. He was 71.

The star, who is most famous for his roles in Get Carter and Bond movie Tomorrow Never Dies, lost his battle with lung cancer at his London home last week (Beg4Aug08).

Rigby became well known in his native England following his starring roles in popular TV series Softly, Softly: Task Force and the BBC's 1980s adaptation of Sherlock Holmes tale, The Hound of the Baskervilles.

His other film roles included Elizabeth and as the voice of Silver in beloved animated children's tale Watership Down.

Rigby began his career in the theatre, attending the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts alongside legendary British TV actor John Thaw.

The actor went on to direct a string of shows in London's West End, most recently Waiting for Godot in 2005.

A spokesman for Rigby says, "He will be sorely missed. There are not so many like him any more. He was a very powerful character actor, able to play villains and nice roles with ease."

Rigby had no immediate survivors.

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