Play for Today (1970–1984)
7.0/10
5
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Plaintiffs and Defendants 

Torn between a long-suffering wife and a neurotic, demanding mistress, a lawyer suffers a series of personal crises.

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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
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Peter
Rosemary McHale ...
Hilary
...
Charles
...
Rosemary Martin ...
Mrs. Sawsbury
Simon Cadell ...
Daniel St. George ...
Jeremy
...
Josh
Victor Langley ...
Mr. Rose
Tom Kempinski ...
The Doctor
David Rose ...
Man
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Storyline

Torn between a long-suffering wife and a neurotic, demanding mistress, a lawyer suffers a series of personal crises.

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Comedy | Drama

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14 October 1975 (UK)  »

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1.33 : 1
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a compact and well-acted drama
15 July 2009 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

'Plaintiffs and Defendants' was the first of a pair of plays written by Simon Gray for the Play for Today series in 1975. Both plays share the same casts but in different roles, some mirroring each other - a fascinating idea.

This play introduces us to Peter, a solicitor who is embroiled in a case of child custody. His wife Hilary is remote and irritated with him and their life together with teenage son Jeremy, while out of hours Peter has been carrying on with the unstable Joanna. The other characters are Charlie and Alison (who we don't actually see as such), friends of long-standing of Peter's, and Sallust, a quiet and dour legal pupil of Peter's who can easily beat him at squash.

In a wordy 60 minutes, we find out about the state of mind of Peter and about things in his past that have impacted on his life - it is one of those plays which includes the type of conversations you'd only ever find in plays and not in real life. This being so it still feels very real and the characters stand up as fully-rounded.

Alan Bates (Peter) and Joanna (Georgina Hale) are probably seen on screen the most, although Simon Cadell (Sallust) and Dinsdale Landen (Charlie) also make a memorable impact. This is a tale of lost opportunities, of giving up things and starting them again, of boredom and routine, and it is played extremely well.

Followed by 'Two Sundays' in the same series, although the two plays can stand as separate works as well as a linked pair.


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